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Thread: Word of the Day...

  1. #771
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    Default Re: Word of the Day...

    amygdaliform \uh-MIG-duh-luh-fawrm\, adjective:

    Shaped like an almond.

    She is naturally blonde, pale, with amygdaliform eyes and high cheekbones.
    -- Gulnar Nazarkhan, The Secret World

    The size and shape of the spores are quite distinctive (globose to subglobose, ovoid, elongate and often almond-shaped – amygdaliform) and with surface ornamentation which may be coarse or fine and individual ornamentation may be low or high and blunt and pointed.
    -- Alec Wood, What Cortinarius Is That?

    Amygdaliform derives from the Greek amygdale, "almond." -form is the common suffix denoting "in the shape of." A portion of the human brain is known as the amygdala, named for its resemblance to almonds.

  2. #772
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    Default Re: Word of the Day...

    lee (ˈlē) noun, protecting shelter

    There was no sign of the man at the water's edge, but when Brad looked downstream, he saw something caught in the lee of a fallen birch about two hundred yards from where he stood.

  3. #773
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    Default Re: Word of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Haunted View Post
    amygdaliform \uh-MIG-duh-luh-fawrm\, adjective:

    Shaped like an almond.

    She is naturally blonde, pale, with amygdaliform eyes and high cheekbones.
    -- Gulnar Nazarkhan, The Secret World

    The size and shape of the spores are quite distinctive (globose to subglobose, ovoid, elongate and often almond-shaped – amygdaliform) and with surface ornamentation which may be coarse or fine and individual ornamentation may be low or high and blunt and pointed.
    -- Alec Wood, What Cortinarius Is That?

    Amygdaliform derives from the Greek amygdale, "almond." -form is the common suffix denoting "in the shape of." A portion of the human brain is known as the amygdala, named for its resemblance to almonds.
    I've always liked "medulla oblongata" - I just like the way it rolls off the tongue


  4. #774
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    Default Re: Word of the Day...

    adiaphorous \ad-ee-AF-er-uhs\, adjective:

    Doing neither good nor harm, as a medicine.

    Sun and Mr. Allworthy are united, but with a difference: the sun, in all his majesty and splendor is, in the words of Boyle, "adiaphorous" unthinking matter, whereas Mr. Allworthy is a moral agent . . .
    -- Jina Politi, The Novel and Its Presuppositions

    . . .which participates of neither extreme, as for example, all those things which, as being neither good nor evil in themselves, we call adiaphorous, or indifferent.
    -- William Watson Goodwin, Plutarch's Morals

    Adiaphorous is derived from the Greek, adiaphoros, meaning 'indifferent.'

  5. #775
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    Default Re: Word of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Neesy View Post
    I've always liked "medulla oblongata" - I just like the way it rolls off the tongue


    And I have always liked: human ChorionicGonadotropin or hCG

  6. #776
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    Default Re: Word of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Haunted View Post
    And I have always liked: human ChorionicGonadotropin or hCG
    With a twist.

    temblor (ˈtem-blər; ˈtem-ˌblȯr, tem-ˈ) noun, earthquake

    Some people claimed to hear a high humming sound from the earth fifteen or twenty minutes before a big temblor (and if some people could hear that sound, it stood to reason that most animals would hear it even more clearly).

  7. #777
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    Default Re: Word of the Day...

    lagan \LAG-uhn\, noun:

    Anything sunk in the sea, but attached to a buoy or the like so that it may be recovered.

    But hear what your Grace does not know. In the sea there are three kinds of things: those at the bottom, lagan; those which float, flotsam; those which the sea throws up on the shore, jetsam.
    -- Victor Hugo, The Man Who Laughs

    "Wreck" shall include jetsam, flotsam, lagan, and derelict found in or on the shores of the sea or any tidal water.
    -- Harry Newsom, The Law of Salvage, Towage, and Pilotage

    Lagan is not as well known as its contextual brethren, flotsam and jetsam. The word comes from the Old Norse word lǫgn which meant "a net laid in the sea."

  8. #778
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    Default Re: Word of the Day...

    algid \AL-jid\, adjective:

    Cold; chilly.

    The sun weakens and grows pale as though seen through algid water and the air is stale and still.
    -- Bryce Courtenay, The Family Frying Pan

    There was an algid texture to the air, causing everyone to shiver involuntarily.
    -- Richard K. Patterson, The Kaleidoscope Project

    A late Renaissance term, algid is derived from the Latin algidus, meaning "cold."

  9. #779
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    Default Re: Word of the Day...

    douce \doos\, adjective:

    Sedate; modest; quiet.

    “So should I have been, in my interview with Sir Thomas— how shall I put it— more douce?”
    -- Hilary Mantel, Wolf Hall

    Port Glasgow is to the east of Greenock, Gourock to the west. The latter town combines a douce middle-class residential area and a Ken MacLeod.
    -- Edited by Gardner Dozois, The Year's Best Science Fiction: Nineteenth Annual Collection

    Douce comes from the French word of the same spelling meaning "sweet." It became widely used in English after it was used in the Chanson of Roland, a epic poem written about Charlemagne.

  10. #780
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    Default Re: Word of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Neesy View Post
    I've always liked "medulla oblongata" - I just like the way it rolls off the tongue
    The adrenal medulla is more tender, though.

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