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Thread: Lawn Jockey

  1. #21
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    Default Re: Lawn Jockey

    Quote Originally Posted by BleakMid View Post
    Nice, I like it! It makes me think of the origins of the humble Cornish pasty (can you get pasties outside of England?). Miners took them to the mines for lunch and left them above ground until they came up for a break. Their wives would cut the miner's initials into the pastry prior to baking so they could be identified later, and the crinkled edge, which nowadays we eat, was used by the miners to hold the pasty, thereby not soiling the rest with their coal blackened fingers. When they were finished eating they'd toss the crust away. Also, many pasties contained both sweet and savory - the meat and potatoes at one end and some kind of sweet fruit at the other. Lord, I suddenly want a pasty....
    http://www.mainstreetcalumet.com/PastyFest/
    Yes, the pasty is a staple around here. And yes, they were carried into the mines...copper mines...by miners of many nationalities. Iron ore mines to the south of us.

    http://www.uppermichiganssource.com/...7#.UWCDQ8rQjr4
    This link contains pics of the miner's statue at the beginning of downtown Houghton, Michigan...note the miner's bucket he carries.

  2. #22
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    Default Re: Lawn Jockey

    Quote Originally Posted by BleakMid View Post
    Nice, I like it! It makes me think of the origins of the humble Cornish pasty (can you get pasties outside of England?). Miners took them to the mines for lunch and left them above ground until they came up for a break. Their wives would cut the miner's initials into the pastry prior to baking so they could be identified later, and the crinkled edge, which nowadays we eat, was used by the miners to hold the pasty, thereby not soiling the rest with their coal blackened fingers. When they were finished eating they'd toss the crust away. Also, many pasties contained both sweet and savory - the meat and potatoes at one end and some kind of sweet fruit at the other. Lord, I suddenly want a pasty....
    I've always wanted to try a real pasty! I love the idea of sweet at one end and savory at the other, too.

    Something similar, but not the same, is a runza or bierock. But the dough is a yeast bread dough, not a pie dough, and the filling is usually cabbage and ground meat. (When I make them it's beef, breakfast sausage, and tons of cabbage.) That, I believe, is a German thing ... oh, Wikipedia tells me it started out as a Russian thing, then spread to Germany. Wikipedia says you can get them all over the Americas, but I am in northwest Missouri, and I think this is about as far south as I've ever seen them. And even so, if I want to get some as takeout (or takeaway, I suppose you'd say) instead of having to make them, I'd have to drive half an hour.

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Lawn Jockey

    http://pasty.com/
    You can watch them make a pasty...order a pasty...

    Never heard of fruit on one side, 'pasty-fillin'' on the other. There's also pork pies over the winter holiday. Called "took-yers"...no idea how to spell it. I think a French-Canadian thing. The pasty usually has a rutabaga, potato, onion, carrot, ground meat (most often beef, although any will work), spices...and they are most often eaten w/ketchup...too, you can dice/cube the veggies up and place in a pan, instead of making dough, and serve like a casserole. Tasty!

  4. #24
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    Default Re: Lawn Jockey

    Quote Originally Posted by Walter Oobleck View Post
    http://pasty.com/
    You can watch them make a pasty...order a pasty...

    Never heard of fruit on one side, 'pasty-fillin'' on the other. There's also pork pies over the winter holiday. Called "took-yers"...no idea how to spell it. I think a French-Canadian thing. The pasty usually has a rutabaga, potato, onion, carrot, ground meat (most often beef, although any will work), spices...and they are most often eaten w/ketchup...too, you can dice/cube the veggies up and place in a pan, instead of making dough, and serve like a casserole. Tasty!
    Ketchup?? None for me, thanks.

  5. #25
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    Default Re: Lawn Jockey

    Quote Originally Posted by Todash View Post
    Ketchup?? None for me, thanks.
    Heh! Like I said, tasty. With or without ketchup, Rich & Tangy, the best.

  6. #26
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    Default Re: Lawn Jockey

    Quote Originally Posted by Walter Oobleck View Post
    http://www.mainstreetcalumet.com/PastyFest/
    Yes, the pasty is a staple around here. And yes, they were carried into the mines...copper mines...by miners of many nationalities. Iron ore mines to the south of us.

    http://www.uppermichiganssource.com/...7#.UWCDQ8rQjr4
    This link contains pics of the miner's statue at the beginning of downtown Houghton, Michigan...note the miner's bucket he carries.
    Tremendous! One day I am going to go to the Calumet Pasty festival!

  7. #27
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    Default Re: Lawn Jockey

    Quote Originally Posted by Todash View Post
    I've always wanted to try a real pasty! I love the idea of sweet at one end and savory at the other, too.

    Something similar, but not the same, is a runza or bierock. But the dough is a yeast bread dough, not a pie dough, and the filling is usually cabbage and ground meat. (When I make them it's beef, breakfast sausage, and tons of cabbage.) That, I believe, is a German thing ... oh, Wikipedia tells me it started out as a Russian thing, then spread to Germany. Wikipedia says you can get them all over the Americas, but I am in northwest Missouri, and I think this is about as far south as I've ever seen them. And even so, if I want to get some as takeout (or takeaway, I suppose you'd say) instead of having to make them, I'd have to drive half an hour.
    OK, they sound very similar to a Polish thing I tried recently at a street market, it was made from mushrooms with lots of cabbage. It was smaller than a Cornish Pasty but very tasty, ah.....

    "I'd have to drive half an hour." - I once took the train from London to Brighton (about an hour) just to buy a veggie burger. It was delicious. I scoffed it down then got back on the train and went back to London. I never told anyone.

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Lawn Jockey

    Quote Originally Posted by BleakMid View Post
    OK, they sound very similar to a Polish thing I tried recently at a street market, it was made from mushrooms with lots of cabbage. It was smaller than a Cornish Pasty but very tasty, ah.....

    "I'd have to drive half an hour." - I once took the train from London to Brighton (about an hour) just to buy a veggie burger. It was delicious. I scoffed it down then got back on the train and went back to London. I never told anyone.
    Ah, I'd do that. You can read on a train. I'll happily stand in line for an hour if I know the end result will be yummy food. It just seems odd to drive half an hour to go through a drive-thru.

  9. #29
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    Dec 2012
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    Default Re: Lawn Jockey

    I must admit, when I read this I didn't quite know what a lawn jockey was exactly, but I figured it was some kind of garden ornament. Even though I'm in Australia, I am familiar with lawn ornaments of a sort...the versions that were often seen in the front yards of suburban houses of my childhood memories (1970s, but I guess the ornaments dated from the 50s) Aboriginal warriors holding spears, made of cement & painted in lurid colours. Extremely kitsch & very politically incorrect!

  10. #30
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    Default Re: Lawn Jockey

    Quote Originally Posted by Todash View Post
    I've always wanted to try a real pasty! I love the idea of sweet at one end and savory at the other, too.

    Something similar, but not the same, is a runza or bierock. But the dough is a yeast bread dough, not a pie dough, and the filling is usually cabbage and ground meat. (When I make them it's beef, breakfast sausage, and tons of cabbage.) That, I believe, is a German thing ... oh, Wikipedia tells me it started out as a Russian thing, then spread to Germany. Wikipedia says you can get them all over the Americas, but I am in northwest Missouri, and I think this is about as far south as I've ever seen them. And even so, if I want to get some as takeout (or takeaway, I suppose you'd say) instead of having to make them, I'd have to drive half an hour.
    Come to Kansas! The large Mennonite population in the central/south part of the state ensures they are served in many restaurants- along with chicken borscht, verinika and zweiback. (though you can't find many Runza's here) I'll be honest- when I make them, I cheat and use frozen roll dough rather than making my own. They still taste delicious!

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