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Another great story

Discussion in 'Duma Key' started by Garriga, Jan 5, 2014.

  1. guido tkp

    guido tkp Well-Known Member

    it took me a few tries to 'get' into it...but then it just sorta swept me up and floated me along...

    i thought it was a great read...one of those books, like DC, BOB, LS ...maybe even GG, that rely as much on a really well developed, finely tuned character plonked down into a richly told tale with intriguing places to take us...it was really well done on nearly all levels...

    my only misgivings (minor, at best) were of the almost, for me, usual variety: the ending...

    like so many other really good books, his endings, for me, sometimes feel all sort of....i don't know...both rushed and sort of incomplete-ish...things suddenly start happening and i'm often left all sort of rumble-tumbled...sorta scratching my head....

    it's like 3-4-500 pages of top notch, i 'get' every moment of this...

    and then...BAM...what just happened ??
     
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  2. Walter Oobleck

    Walter Oobleck keeps coming back...or going, and going, and going

    What I liked about the ending is the possible connection to The Dark Tower saga. Probably just me so I won't bother going into detail and too I imagine most would believe it a spoiler, but think wells and Wolves...and too, there was that line earlier in Duma, had to do with a well and maybe a kid on the east coast. Don't recall the exact details. I've noticed in a few of King's stories, say like in It...maybe The Talisman...probably others...there is a kind of climax a ways before the last page. Reminded of something Twain said, or wrote...about endings...something he was working on, didn't know how to end it so he marched everyone out into the yard and threw them down the well.
     
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  3. taylor29

    taylor29 Well-Known Member

    my only misgivings (minor, at best) were of the almost, for me, usual variety: the ending...


    like so many other really good books, his endings, for me, sometimes feel all sort of....i don't know...both rushed and sort of incomplete-ish...things suddenly start happening and i'm often left all sort of rumble-tumbled...sorta scratching my head....

    it's like 3-4-500 pages of top notch, i 'get' every moment of this...

    and then...BAM...what just happened ??[/QUOTE]

    I think the endings are King's biggest challenge as a storyteller. At the end, most of the plots deflate like balloons. It can be frustrating as a reader....
     
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  4. guido tkp

    guido tkp Well-Known Member

    yes..i can see that,T29...some times i feel as if he has too many balls floating through the air and can't quite juggle them down

    hey, walt...i got that too...and, if i think back on it, maybe by the time i got to the end of that book, i was possibly feeling like 'oh gooooooooooooodddddddd !!! not another book suddenly taken over by having to interconnect it all !'

    which...if i think back on it, doesn't make sense...'cause an awful lot that does go on in DK (and, for that matter, alot of other books) could easily be...influenced...by the greater wheel...kinda like pieces of a puzzle that only make sense at the end...

    either way...when i have that sense of ending deja-vu....it never really bother me a whole lot, or changes the way i feel about the book...they just sometimes hit me as being...feeling rushed...odd...awkward...like something might be missing at times

    as sting said...it's probably me
     
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  5. Autumn13

    Autumn13 Active Member

    The italics can be a problem and not just in Duma Key. The type face used in so many of his books can make it hard to differentiate an h from a b. I have to stop and figure out if the word is how or bow (sorry but the italics feature on this site doesn't use that font).
    I thought it was old age creeping up on me. I have to have those "readers" all the time now.
    But as to how many times Wireman called Edgar or Jack "muchacho" - how many times do guys call each other buddy or man on a daily basis?
    I actually looked up some of the Spanish phrases and got a hoot out of some and learned a lot from others.
     
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  6. Sunlight Gardener

    Sunlight Gardener Well-Known Member

    My favorite all time SK book, probably 1 and 1a with this and The Talisman. I thought it was perfect the first time I read it. The 5 times afterwards I still thought it was perfect.
     
  7. CTKeith

    CTKeith New Member

    New guy chiming in.
    One of my favs.
    2 thumbs up.
     
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  8. Neesy

    Neesy #1 fan (Annie Wilkes cousin) 1st cousin Mom's side

    Welcome CTKeith :cheerful:

    [​IMG] :tickled_pink:
     
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  9. Tery

    Tery Everybody got to deviate from the norm Moderator

    Welcome CTKeith!
     
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  10. Mocos

    Mocos Active Member

    I read it in print about 6 years ago and wasn't too impressed. Now, with my sight failing, I "read" it again as an audiobook and loved it. I remember the "teef" on the bigboy and am disappointed that I didn't notice it on the audio. Oh well. Anyway, what really struck me this time around is how Perse really isn't very scary, but everytime the sun goes down, I get a little nervous now, lol. I think it's because of the heroes in the book. They were scared. The whole mood and tone...hell, the attitude of the book seemed to scream that something horrendous would happen if Perse was allowed to stay awake, even though I didn't see any real evidence of that. To me, Perse seems like a somewhat mischievous and definitely uncaring demigod out of mythology. She's just also extremely spiteful. When someone tries to put a stop to her fun, she takes full revenge. That's all. But to Edgar, Wireman, and probably Jack (certainly him, by the end), that revenge is, and will be, horrendous. And that feeling was communicated perfectly. I think that if I saw a bird flying upside-down, I'd think it only highly unusual, but when Edgar saw it, I clearly felt the insanity of it. Great emoting in this book.
     
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  11. César Hernández-Meraz

    César Hernández-Meraz Wants to be Nick, ends up as Larry

    Dunno about that. It would not be a bird spinning and flying upside-down for a short while, I think, but one that looks perfectly comfortable and stable flying as if gravity were pulling it to the sky, instead of the floor.

    dodo.jpg

    I think some of young Elizabeth's creations could fit right into a cartoon (like any appearance of Wackyland, originally from a Porky Pig cartoon, or some Felix the Cat series).

    If I saw a bird flying that way, I would definitely keep thinking it is impossible, even if I saw it happen.
     
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