King Jv

Discussion in 'Religion' started by Dr. Fudd, Nov 30, 2013.

  1. Dr. Fudd
    Offline

    Dr. Fudd Bored Taster

    More of what we all loved on the old board, made new! Mostly in-depth bible study but if you'd like to discuss the religious overtones of Stephen Kings works, we can still do that. It did play out pretty quickly on the previous board, but then, there could always be ground we didn't cover. Don't be shy or intimidated, there are no stupid questions and there is always room to review the basics if that's where you are, or go deeper, if that's the part of the path you find yourself on. The bible is a bottomless well of inspiration, knowledge, wisdom and most of all, salvation. All opinions and viewpoints are welcomed and discussed. And remember, the fruit of the Spirit is self control, if you find that you have trouble discussing faith without getting very angry, then this is where you NEED to be! to learn how!!
    Becks19, 91rewoT, Ebdim9th and 7 others like this.
  2. Walter Oobleck
    Offline

    Walter Oobleck keeps coming back...or going, and going, and going

    One idea that I find curious is expressed in more than a few stories...Insomnia...Green Mile...It...so if you who are reading this do not like reading things, any thing about a story you've yet to read, best ignore me and my posts. I don't think some of these...ideas...whatnot, are spoilers, but you might think so.

    Anyway, in Insomnia, there is present this idea that there is another force in the universe...one that does not necessarily come from the established camps of good and evil. The Crimson King is confused about the Green Man...on the plane. Good, bad, otherwise? Consider the earrings, their ultimate destination, almost a prank. Earlier there is a line that has to do with the birth of the Christ. The question is raised about the wise men...as in...how wise could these men be, considering their question to Herod, considering his response--to issue an executive order to kill all the newborn in the land. What motivated the wise men to do such a thing, given the outcome? I've considered the three little docs...the number three...and have wondered if that is at play...or if that is only that the...Greeks, right? If that is only their thing. But then, too...moving outside King's stories...or maybe not...consider the Father Son & Holy Ghost...the trinity, one. Given that...perhaps evil wears three faces...and it's not a matter of good/evil/otherwise...but one of good/better/best or choose your adjective.

    Seems like this idea in general is expressed in Green Mile, as well...but I'd have to dig it off the shelf, look at my notes/indexes (pencil scribbles as I read) to see how so.
  3. Dr. Fudd
    Offline

    Dr. Fudd Bored Taster

    I'm a little vague in my memory of the specific application of the theme in the stories, but in the bible, Herod asked the wise men to find out where the baby Jesus was "so that I may come and worship Him also." ref Matt2:8. A few verses later in Matt2:12 God warns the wise men not to return to Herod. They worshipped Jesus, there's no evidence that they were aware of Herods plans.

    If there is only one ultimate truth, then there really can't be a third force that isn't contrary to that single truth. Not saying that there aren't more than good and evil. But any force, no matter how benevolent, if it is not Good, and God in this instance, serves evil eventually because it misses the mark. But the number three is very prevalent in the bible. It's the number signifying completion. God is complete in three and in one. Jesus completed His sacrifice and mission in the grave in 3 days, the arch type Jonah, also in the belly of the whale for three days, the benecition: in the name of the father, the son and the Holy Spirit for blessings. Pilate tried to release Jesus 3 times. It's continual. But I believe evil wears far more than three faces since one of the faces of evil looks like good, in that satan can appear as an angel of light.ref2cor11:14
    I always saw the docs as reapers. Since they snipped the mortal coil.
    91rewoT, Ebdim9th, blunthead and 2 others like this.
  4. Walter Oobleck
    Offline

    Walter Oobleck keeps coming back...or going, and going, and going

    Yes. Curious that Matthew's gospel concerns itself w/the Magi...while Luke's looks at the birth of Christ through the eyes of the shepherds. In Matthew's story, the Magi/wise men from the eat ask Herod where the king of the Jews has been born. Don't get why Herod calls them/the Magi...after speaking w/the people's priests and teachers....calls them secretly...typical politician, I guess. And then later in Matthew's story, we learn Herod believed he was outwitted by the Magi...and then he decides to kill boys two years and under.
    91rewoT, Ebdim9th, skimom2 and 3 others like this.
  5. Dr. Fudd
    Offline

    Dr. Fudd Bored Taster

    I'm not getting where the magi, or the wise men are asking Herod where Jesus is. Herod asks them where he is, so that he, Herod, can worship Him.
  6. Walter Oobleck
    Offline

    Walter Oobleck keeps coming back...or going, and going, and going

    I think it is from the second verse of the 2nd chapter...they came, they asked...Herod heard, was disturbed...began to plot.
  7. Dr. Fudd
    Offline

    Dr. Fudd Bored Taster

    It's amazing how many times I've read that chapter and read right over the fact that the wise men did ask first! I ask God to reveal His mysteries in the bible, but he's still having to reveal the painfully obvious to me.
    Also amazing how much this action of Herod looks like the first Passover in Eygypt.
  8. HollyGolightly
    Offline

    HollyGolightly Well-Known Member

    Not an accident, I'm certain.
    91rewoT, Ebdim9th, Cowboy and 3 others like this.
  9. Dr. Fudd
    Offline

    Dr. Fudd Bored Taster

    There are so many parallels in the bible, and then consider the ultimate author. I stopped believing in conicidance when I began to believe in Jesus.
    Ebdim9th, Cowboy, blunthead and 2 others like this.
  10. blunthead
    Offline

    blunthead Well-Known Member

    I think, I suppose somewhat simplistically, of the Old Testament as a story about the need for and a leading up to the first coming of Christ, and the New Testament as a story about what Christ accomplished. So, as I believe nothing is left out of the Bible which should be there, I think there are no accidents or coincidences in the Bible or in life, that the Old Testament continuously refers to Christ in all kinds of ways. I also know from experience that a person can read scripture endlessly and find new things endlessly.

    While reading 'Salem's Lot I was impressed with sK's research into the Catholic denomination's doctrines, with an apparent view not to criticize, and liked that he wrote Father Callahan as a sympathetic character, whose faith failed him due not to faith being a bogus concept, but to human weakness (the spirit being willing, but the flesh being weak). I've always liked the classic symbolism of the Christian cross (good) capable against Vampires (evil), and was pleased to see sK remaining true to that simple, if politically incorrect, approach.
  11. blunthead
    Offline

    blunthead Well-Known Member

    I've yet to read The Green Mile, and now when I do I'll be looking for these things you've pointed out.

    I don't really know where sK stands specifically, spiritually speaking. But I do see that he respects all kinds of belief systems as legitimate in their own right, just doesn't necessarily endorse any. In fact, as far as I know, he avoids such endorsing. There are times I wish he hadn't included certain political comments, especially when naming names, as I sense it as non-art. But, fortunately for me as a Christian fan, he gives place to "God", even "The Man Jesus", in the category of Good, which he really doesn't have to do. I suspect there's an underlying, if subconscious, leaning in sK toward not only God Himself but even Jesus Himself, though that might be wishful thinking. I know that he's publicly stated that he believes in God. I seem to remember his being interested in Seminary at one point, but I might've dreamed that. :)
  12. blunthead
    Offline

    blunthead Well-Known Member

  13. blunthead
    Offline

    blunthead Well-Known Member

    The first sK book I remember making personal note of focusing on"God", among other things, was Desperation, in which a boy protagonist has a personal relationship with God, whom He helps the him and his friends accomplish their mission against pure Evil. I found the specific inclusion of God in the story very interesting. I don't mean that I thought it was particularly telling about sK, other than that it was the first of his I'd read wherein he demonstrates what I think of as a kind of three-dimensional imagination, a feature in his style I've noticed many times since. I liked in Desperation how sK's placement of God in the story seems to dramatically reinforce the good vs evil aspect of it. I kind of visualize the story as a three-dimensional image built upon a cross; the action of the human characters move as it were horizontally, while God and Evil's interaction are vertical. To me the presence of God in the story sort of pulls it open from being two-dimensional, where the good guys simply do battle with an adversary, to having depth and height and breadth, making it much more interesting, enjoyable, and fun to look at.
  14. skimom2
    Offline

    skimom2 Just moseyin' through...

    Remember, each Gospel had a different 'audience', or goal, initially. Matthew was persuading a Jewish audience, thus he emphasizes scripture and prophecy, which is what the Magi used. Luke was a Greek physician, and so was concerned with convincing and amazing the logical Greeks. John was making a legal case, and Mark was likely Peter's story (written down by Mark), and so is the shortest and most straight ahead STORY--one man's life-changing experience. I find it the most powerful, emotionally, but I learned a hell of a lot from studying John and Luke.
  15. blunthead
    Offline

    blunthead Well-Known Member

    I like what you've posted here. Thanx!
  16. skimom2
    Offline

    skimom2 Just moseyin' through...

    Sho nuff! :)
  17. blunthead
    Offline

    blunthead Well-Known Member

    I read Joyland recently. One of the players is a TV evangelist who, while not the most savory character suspect of hypocrisy, yet sK gives reprieve when
    the psychic boy states that sometimes the evangelist actually does work miracles.
    Neesy, Ebdim9th and HollyGolightly like this.
  18. HollyGolightly
    Offline

    HollyGolightly Well-Known Member

    Well said! Clearly you didn't end your spiritual formation after confirmation, as so many do.
  19. skimom2
    Offline

    skimom2 Just moseyin' through...

    I have the advantage of being a convert :) When you make the choice as an adult (I was 22, I think), there's more incentive to go in depth. My kids were raised in the faith (naturally), and it's a constant tussle to have them NOT take for granted that they 'know everything', like knowledge comes through blood--lol.
  20. skimom2
    Offline

    skimom2 Just moseyin' through...

    I'm so looking forward to reading JOYLAND! I was broke when it came out (lol), so I'm crossing my fingers for Christmas :)
    Neesy, Ebdim9th and blunthead like this.

Share This Page

Faithful Deluxe Special Editions