I Think You're All Crazy!!!!!

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Neesy

#1 fan (Annie Wilkes cousin) 1st cousin Mom's side
May 24, 2012
57,796
215,157
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
#23
I absolutely loved the book Cell. There are people who say that it wasn't King's best work, or that it lacked some of that good old Stephen King Magic. There is no way that King lacks his personal magic in any of his books and I thought this book was great! I don't know if some of you don't like zombie stories or what the issue is but I thought this book was a great read. Also, the book was sad at times, however, it is not like the whole book was sad. I think that every one should do a re-read on this book, and that they should make sure to make it through. I do think that King writes to suit many different palates and tastes, and this is what makes him the writer that he is (awesome). I was just shocked to read that so many King fans disliked this book!
I like it. Overall I did enjoy this book and I am looking forward to seeing what they do with the movie.
 

Neesy

#1 fan (Annie Wilkes cousin) 1st cousin Mom's side
May 24, 2012
57,796
215,157
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
#24
Is there some truth though to the seed of his writing Cell being in his early dislike of cell phones? Or did I totally make that up? I could swear I had read something like that before the book was published.
This is just copied and pasted from "The Library" at Stephen King dot com:
Cell
Inspiration:

While walking on the sidewalk in New York, Steve saw a man dressed in a business suit approaching him and seemingly engaged in conversation with himself. Since people talking to themselves on a public street would usually be among those whose "reality" was a bit different than the norm, Steve became a bit apprehensive. He realized as the man got closer, however, that he was talking on a cell phone using a headset. It was the incongruity of a person who may not be in touch with reality, but dressed in a business suit that sparked the idea for Cell.
 
Jul 6, 2014
24
99
32
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
#26
I think he did say somewhere (I'm terrible at remembering where I read something--forgive me) that he disliked cell phones. I'm more than a little conflicted about them myself; maybe that's why I liked this story so much.

About Mr. King's endings, here's where I think the problem lies: There are readers out there who want one of two things. First, they want a neatly tied up ending--no loose ends, every damn issue solved. Second, they want a big bang; in that, they remind me of the movie Amadeus, where Salieri tells Mozart that his subtle ending doesn't work--the people want a bang so they know where to clap. Mr. King rarely does either of these things. It seems to me (and Ms Mod would be the real authority here) that Mr. King is trying to create worlds that reflect real life, and real life is messy. We usually never know the real story of anything, we rarely see every problem solved, and no one tells us when something is over with a crash. Things just sort of… end. And we move on, because that's what real people do. We pick ourselves up and do the next thing, and hope to God that we make it through the next whatever no worse off than we are now. That's people.

I realize that I probably think about this kind of stuff way too much (lol), but I admire the hell out of Mr. King as a writer. He never leans down and kisses the reader's butt for applause. He holds up a mirror; some things you're gonna like, some things you won't. But it's no more than a reflection of who we are as human beings.

It is in the very beginning of the book, like a little notation.
 

blunthead

Well-Known Member
Aug 2, 2006
80,756
195,358
Atlanta GA
#33
You're remembering correctly that he wasn't a fan of cell phones when they first became mainstream. He didn't like the idea of always being available. I could be wrong, but I suspect Tabby may have had some influence with his eventually getting one. ;)
I remember now actually talking or PMing someone about this. I remember thinking sK and I were similar in that when it came to new electronic technology he and I both resisted change. For instance, I didn't buy any CDs for the longest time, and also did without a cell phone as long as possible.
 

SharonC

Eternal Members
Jul 9, 2007
2,958
11,251
Canada
#39
One of my least favourite SK books. I felt it was a bit formulaic, and (for me) there was never very much at stake emotionally, which is unusual for his books.
I read it when it was first published. I didn't really connect with any of the characters at all. None of them, including the "Hero" were likable to me. The idea itself was pretty original, but if you can't feel for or with any of the characters, it just doesn't go anywhere for me.
 

AnnaMarie

Well-Known Member
Feb 16, 2012
7,026
29,219
Other
#40
You're remembering correctly that he wasn't a fan of cell phones when they first became mainstream. He didn't like the idea of always being available. I could be wrong, but I suspect Tabby may have had some influence with his eventually getting one. ;)
Probably. And they come in handy when crazy fans are around. ;)

My husbands boss (owner of the company) provides cell phones to most of the employees, but always refused to carry one himself. Also refuses to wear a watch. When travelling with my husband, he always tells him who to call, who to text. Then one day, my husband caught him talking on a cell phone. He looked a little guilty and said it's so his daughter can keep in touch with him no matter where he is.
 
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