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On my 4th time reading Duma, and I just realized...

Discussion in 'Duma Key' started by mrblonde, Feb 7, 2014.

  1. mrblonde

    mrblonde Well-Known Member

    Elizabeth Eastlake isn't black.

    For some reason I always assumed she was black while reading this. I caught the "black help" line this time around.

    It doesn't change the (amazing) story any for me, but I was a bit surprised.

    I guess I had Abby in my head while reading :)
  2. blunthead

    blunthead Well-Known Member

    It's always fascinated me how we create someone in our heads based on info provided us by only one of our senses. For instance, I tend to picture what a radio personality looks like until that idealized "person" is as real as anyone to my mind. Why you, mrblonde, pictured Elizabeth Eastlake as you did is anyone's guess. In literature we have our eyes to interpret what the author describes, but our own interpretations inevitably differ from the author's and from each other. So, casting for movies is always a thankless job, and radio personalities always disappoint in person.
  3. mrblonde

    mrblonde Well-Known Member

    I "cast" every book I read in my head, and I'm usually disappointed with the actual casting if/when they do make the movie. The only recent casting I LOVED was "Savages." I though they nailed that one.

    for Duma I have the following in my head:

    Edgar: Gil Grissom
    Wireman: Bruce Campbell

    I'm sure there are better choices, but that is who I see when I read.
  4. booklover72

    booklover72 very strange person

    Duma Key was published 2 weeks after my grandmother died and it helped me escape the misery. thanks stephen
  5. bigkingfan91

    bigkingfan91 Well-Known Member

    Bruce Campbell as Wireman, wow!!! I do the same with all stories, and that's exactly who I pictured for Wireman. John Cusack for Edgar, I wouldn't mind that to be honest.

    The old lady from Skeleton Key, I'd LOVE to see her as Elizabeth, assuming she is still alive?
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  6. skimom2

    skimom2 Just moseyin' through...

    Just finished this for the second time--I'd forgotten so much! Very happy that the scene that made me actually gasp the first time I read it (I hadn't had that reaction in a very long time) got me again :)

    I see Wireman as Alfred Molina, Jack as John Krasinski, Elizabeth as Frances Sternhagen, Ilse as Isla Fisher or Anna Kendirck. Edgar is harder--as it's in 1st person, there's not much of a description of him. I had a vague notion of someone like Bill Pullman, though. Fun to fantasy cast, isn't it? :)
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  7. fljoe0

    fljoe0 Cantre Member

    except of course, Scott. ;-D
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  8. taylor29

    taylor29 Well-Known Member

    What about Daniel Day Lewis as he looks in real life or an aged Colin Firth as Edgar. I feel that for the movie anyway, we need a more compelling-looking fellow. :)
    blunthead and Neesy like this.
  9. Sunlight Gardener

    Sunlight Gardener Well-Known Member

    I just assumed from the get go her family was white because they were an old time wealthy Southern family who had a Black nanny/housekeeper.
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 16, 2014
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  10. chief4db

    chief4db When it doubt, run!

    What???? What do you mean she isn't black. I pictured her as black from the get go. Shocked she isnt.
    blunthead likes this.
  11. Steffen

    Steffen Well-Known Member

    Bryan Cranston as Edgar. Jeff Bridges as Wireman. I really liked this book.
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  12. chief4db

    chief4db When it doubt, run!

    im sorry all but I have re read a few sections over the last couple of days and Elizabeth Eastlake is black. I don't care if I meet her someday and she is white as a milky cloud, I will look her in the face and say, "I know your white, I can see that, but in duma key you were black," and walk away.
  13. César Hernández-Meraz

    César Hernández-Meraz Well-Known Member

    Those would be the parts of her soul shaped after her love for Nan Melda, who practically becomes her mother. I think if you told her that, she would smile and nod.
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  14. Sunlight Gardener

    Sunlight Gardener Well-Known Member

    I am discovering that apparently this is a popular sentiment. Now, I have read or listened to Duma Key at least 6 times now and I have no idea where people are getting this. She grew up in the 30's or 40's in the deep South in an extremely wealthy family that had a Black Nanny/housekeeper. How on Earth does this lead people to believe that she is Black?

    The only thing I can come up with is that people are mistakenly thinking that Nan Melda (The Housekeeper and Mother figure to Elizabeth) is actually Elizabeth's Mother. They are not related. She serves as the mother figure because Elizabeth's birth Mother died when she was a baby. I could be wrong but I'm pretty sure there are even a couple instances in the book where Nan Melda even makes comments about the Eastlakes being rich white folks.
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  15. César Hernández-Meraz

    César Hernández-Meraz Well-Known Member

    Funny thing, even though Wireman gets a physical description, I always see him as black (I have to force myself to think of him as the description).

    I think this was because of the image of a particular black man comes to my mind. I see Wireman as someone whose company can be very enjoyable, with a pleasant smile and an intelligent look in his eyes, and who also has a deep voice. So I think of Mr. Michael Clarke Duncan. It is very difficult for me to beat that image, so perhaps Wireman will always remain at least part black in my mind. :redface-new:
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  16. Sunlight Gardener

    Sunlight Gardener Well-Known Member

    Even though he speaks Spanish throughout the entire book?;;D
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  17. César Hernández-Meraz

    César Hernández-Meraz Well-Known Member

    Well, I was born and live in Mexico. All the black people I know (not that many, but in Mexico a lot of us have lack ancestry mixed in somewhere) speak Spanish. =D
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  18. Sunlight Gardener

    Sunlight Gardener Well-Known Member

    Lol, in your case I can see where the confusion comes from.
    Neesy likes this.
  19. Doc Creed

    Doc Creed Well-Known Member

    Really inspired choices, I love it. Bryan Cranston would be perfect.
    Neesy likes this.
  20. Doc Creed

    Doc Creed Well-Known Member

    When I imagine the book being made into a movie I hear Enya soundtrack, maybe CaribbeanBlue and then maybe a score by Thomas Newman. I don't see this as a horror novel. There is magical realism and horror elements but it has a lot of heart. It's about a man fighting against his suicidal impulses and completely re imaging his life through art and creativity...with dire consequences, in Stephen King fashion. Wireman, while not infallible, is a kind of sage to Edgar, guiding him and supporting him in his new world. I heard Darabont was directing King's short story, The Monkey, but this has his name written all over it.
    Last thoughts: King began to conquer new territory with his books The Green Mile, Bag of Bones, Lisey's Story, and Duma Key. What I mean is that he seriously tackled subjects like losing a spouse, child, or even mortality itself with more aplomb and contemplation. While he doesn't fundamentally change his style I think he shows growth and maturity in this new landscape. I've never seen this more evident than with his new story collection, Bazaar of Bad Dreams.

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