'Salem's Lot Illustrated Edition Art
Works / Novels

'Salem's Lot Illustrated Edition

'Salem's Lot Illustrated Edition Art

Released

November 11th, 2005

Available Format(s)

Hardcover

Publisher

Doubleday

Author Ben Mears returns to ‘Salem's Lot to write a book about a house that has haunted him since childhood only to find his isolated hometown infested with vampires. While the vampires claim more victims, Mears convinces a small group of believers to combat the undead.

Includes a new Introduction by Stephen, photographs by Jerry Uelsmann, and in the back of the book includes pages that were omitted from the original publication, and the short stories One for the Road and Jerusalem's Lot.

From the Flap

Upon its initial publication in 1975, 'Salem's Lot was recognized as a landmark work. The novel has sold millions of copies in various editions, but it wasn't until Centipede Press published a special limited edition in 2004 that King's masterpiece was brought to brilliant and eerie life. With the addition of fifty pages of material deleted from the 1975 manuscript as well as material that has since been modified by King, an introduction by him, and two short stories related to the events of the novel, this edition represents the text as the author envisioned it. Centipede's deluxe edition, of which only nine hundred copies were printed, features lavishly creepy photographs by acclaimed photographer Jerry Uelsmann, printed interior endpapers, and a stunning page design.

Doubleday is proud to make this volume, printed from the original design of the Centipede press edition, available to the general reader. No King aficionado's library will be complete without this definitive illustrated edition of the great 'Salem's Lot.

Inspiration

One of my high school classes was Fantasy and Science Fiction, and one of the novels I taught was Dracula. I was surprised at how vital it had remained over the years; the kids liked it, and I liked it, too. One night over supper I wondered aloud what would happen if Dracula came back in the twentieth century, to America. "He'd probably be run over by a Yellow Cab on Park Avenue and killed," my wife said. That closed the discussion, but in the following days, my mind kept returning to the idea. It occurred to me that my wife was probably right - if the legendary Count came to New York, that was. But if he were to show up in a sleepy little country town, what then? I decided I wanted to find out, so I wrote 'Salem's Lot, which was originally titled Second Coming.

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