Gave up

Discussion in 'Joyland' started by AnnaMarie, Feb 11, 2014.

  1. HMW

    HMW Well-Known Member

    Valid point!
     
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  2. Garriga

    Garriga Well-Known Member

    Joyland is great. I read it in two days.

    IMO: the plot doesn't matter. This story has memorable characters like Mr. Easterbrook and Tom. Even the floozy Wendy is a good character. I was expecting her to say, "Let's take a selfie."

    Good characters, good writing, Great story.
     
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  3. Jimpy

    Jimpy Well-Known Member

    I had no problem reading Joyland, and in less than 36 hours. I have had trouble starting some Stephen King books in the past. It probably took me six or eight tries to get into Bag of Bones, but once I did, I really enjoyed it. Ditto Desperation, Duma Key, Insomnia and The Cell, although they may have taken a couple fewer tries each. I have never completely given up on a Stephen King book. Usually I read it right after it comes out. And mostly I read it quickly., forgoing such things as sleep or work.

    Jimpy

    If you can't take the heat don't swim with the big dogs.
     
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  4. Neesy

    Neesy #1 fan (Annie Wilkes cousin) 1st cousin Mom's side

    Have you read Lisey's Story? - I found that one hard to get into but it did get better and by the end I liked it a lot.
     
  5. Jimpy

    Jimpy Well-Known Member

    That's another one that I had to start a few times. His last three non dark tower novels were all ones I read right away. In fact I read 11/22/63 twice in the first weel after it came out. At the risk of sounding old, I remember what I was doing that day, 11/22/63 not the day the book came out. I was in kindergarten at W B Patterson Elementary School in Washington DC and the teacher got a message and she started crying and told us what happened and we got sent home. Then they shut down the city and I didn't see my father, who was a marine for about 5 days. In my mind 11/22/63, or perhaps Just After Sunset, kicked off a now golden age of Stephen King for me.
     
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  6. Walter Oobleck

    Walter Oobleck keeps coming back...or going, and going, and going

    I did finish it, and finishing provided reason enough to wish I had not. Here we have a young man of age during the time of Vietnam, the 60s, perhaps early 70s but definitely a time when others his age were out-and-about, voicing their political concerns. Yeah, sure, read Hearts in Atlantis. So I was thrown off the story at the end when he gets political about Chenney's heart. Like, give me a puckin' break! And that is a laughable hoot considering some of my recent posts that have been edited for content. I think what we have here is failure to communicate. Heh! The guy isn't political, at all, throughout the story...the story was not politics. But King has to throw in that vitriol about Chenney's heart at the end and I believe the story suffers because of it. And I know damn well those who love the Juice still believe he is as innocent as Wonder Bread. Such is life. :)
     
  7. Neesy

    Neesy #1 fan (Annie Wilkes cousin) 1st cousin Mom's side

    I was in kindergarten too (hmmm - we must be the same age)
     
  8. jchanic

    jchanic Well-Known Member

    Walter, I was just out of college during that time (I graduated from Kent State University in August 1969) and am a Vietnam veteran. During my college years, MOST of the student body didn't care one bit about any political concerns--all they were interested in was getting through the coursework and their girl or boy friends. It was only a very small minority (including some outsiders) that caused the upheaval in May of 1970 at the University--my wife, daughter and I lived right across the street from the campus at the time.

    John
     
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