Lord Of The Flies

Discussion in 'Bred Any Good Rooks Lately? (Suggested Reading)' started by AnnaRose, Nov 10, 2013.

  1. Ben.
    Offline

    Ben. Active Member

    As my Mother says, FlakeNoir: "Kids, who'd have 'em?"
    MadamMack and FlakeNoir like this.
  2. skimom2
    Online

    skimom2 Just moseyin' through...

    The language gets them, I think. So much YA lit is written at a 5th grade level--kids often don't have the vocab. for classic books, or they can't follow through with a complex thought. It's a learned skill--they'll get it if you don't give up!

    I'm a 'mean' mom: if my kids had a book project and didn't pick a book within a reasonable amount of time, I chose for them. As a result, by 7th grade the big ones got assigned (by me) Lord of the Flies, Of Mice and Men, Ethan Frome... :) Anything shorter, but still a classic. Two littlest go to a better school, so their teachers help me out now--haha!
  3. ghost19
    Offline

    ghost19 .....Damn Zombies.....

    One of those very rare instances where I liked the movie more than the book. Book was very hard to read thru, seemed quite dry and uninteresting...much like myself.....
    MadamMack and Neesy like this.
  4. AnnaRose
    Offline

    AnnaRose Well-Known Member

    Did you read the book first or see the movie? I generally like whichever I saw/read first better. And which version did you watch? I haven't seen either...I suppose I'll watch both.
    Neesy likes this.
  5. Walter o'Dim
    Offline

    Walter o'Dim Member

    The story is good but I hate the way they talk.
    Ralph was an ass to piggy throughout the book It really bothered me. Actually they were all pretty mean to piggy.
    I also hated the word ass-mar.
  6. fljoe0
    Offline

    fljoe0 Cantre Member

    Are you talking about the 1960s version? If so, I just saw a new version on blu-ray. They have fixed it up and it looks 100 times better than I've ever seen it. They fixed the audio too. See if you can find a blu-ray copy to rent or buy. They did a great job with the restoration.
    Walter Oobleck and Neesy like this.
  7. Robert Trigger
    Offline

    Robert Trigger New Member

    When I read it at first i didn't think i was going to like it but after I got more into the story and some of the action and I guess you could say violence started to happen I seemed to enjoy it more, it made the story interesting!
    skimom2 and Walter Oobleck like this.
  8. Robert Trigger
    Offline

    Robert Trigger New Member

    I also agree, i hated the way that they treated piggy, when all he would ever do was try to help.
    Walter Oobleck likes this.
  9. ColbyWhitt
    Offline

    ColbyWhitt New Member

    I feel that if it would have been all girls then they wouldn't have made it as far as they have. Girls wouldn't understand and know what to do if they were put on a island by themselves. Some girls wouldn't know where to start by collecting the food and building a fire to produce smoke so that someone may see them. girls would have had each other killed the first three days they would be on the island. This is a very good and meaningful book.
    skimom2 and Walter Oobleck like this.
  10. Cory Dillard
    Offline

    Cory Dillard New Member

    I agree. If it were all girls, I think things would be more organized but things would eventually get bad.
    skimom2 and Walter Oobleck like this.
  11. Eryk Clark
    Offline

    Eryk Clark New Member

    I agree here, because i have seen what just two girls in one household can do to each other within about two weeks. Girls would rip each other apart in a very short amount of time. The main reason for this is because most women like to in control of the situation.
    Walter Oobleck likes this.
  12. Tiffany.
    Offline

    Tiffany. New Member

    I agree with you, Robert. When I read it the first time I thought that it was a bit boring and I wasn't too interested at first, but the more I read the more I wanted to keep reading. It reminds me of some of the things I read by Stephen King, which is one of my favorite authors. I recommend reading this book to anyone who enjoys mystery books or anyone who enjoys reading. ;-D
    skimom2 and Walter Oobleck like this.
  13. admiralnarwhal
    Offline

    admiralnarwhal New Member

    I recently read this for English class. I was completely caught off guard when the group turned and killed Simon. As morbid as it sounds I was kind of expecting Piggy's death though. The story seemed to end a little too abruptly. One second there's an intense chase all around the burning island and the next everyone is sobbing on the beach and being rescued. It was a good ending but just seemed to come out of nowhere.
    skimom2 and Walter Oobleck like this.
  14. admiralnarwhal
    Offline

    admiralnarwhal New Member

    Maybe not at first, but eventually the evil that is a part of nearly everyone would begin to change that. The whole story is telling how that evil would make people revert back to savagery, whether by choice or not, if left alone long enough. For Jack it was more of a choice but even Ralph and Piggy found savagery at least slightly enticing once they experienced it.
    skimom2 and Walter Oobleck like this.
  15. Walter Oobleck
    Offline

    Walter Oobleck keeps coming back...or going, and going, and going

    Doesn't anyone think that with girls they'd bring out the caring nature that seems to be inherent in the female of the species?
    skimom2 likes this.
  16. ghost19
    Offline

    ghost19 .....Damn Zombies.....

    I've read the book several times over the years. I saw the movie but I had read the book at least once, maybe twice before seeing the movie. I very much liked the movie, it seemed to capture the savagery better than the book did, which again, is rare. I think the first time I read it was in 8th grade or something like that, then again in college, and about ten years ago. It's hard to describe. I can see the value of the book, but it's one of those books where I find myself having to fight to keep my attention on the reading. Just seems flat for some reason....not the book GNT, I know the book itself is flat....lol:)
    skimom2 and Walter Oobleck like this.
  17. Mr Nobody
    Offline

    Mr Nobody Well-Known Member

    I think it'd depend on their age. Based on observation of my sister's friendships, etc, when we were kids and what I know of things my niece has gone through, girls often have it pretty rough. Perhaps even more so than boys (who, as natural individualists/competitors, either just shrug it off or have a punch-up).
    Put boys in a survival situation and they'll generally form a hierarchy - as they/we do anyway. Put girls in a survival situation and all bets are off. The usual narrative would be that "girls would be more co-operative and work together", but when push came to shove and there wasn't enough to go around...that's when things would become distinctly chaotic.
    skimom2 and Walter Oobleck like this.
  18. Walter Oobleck
    Offline

    Walter Oobleck keeps coming back...or going, and going, and going

    There's a couple of great lines in another great story, from Steinbeck, East of Eden: I believe there are monsters born in the world to human parents. Seems to offer an idea or two for debate about evil. Here, Steinbeck suggests evil is born into the world. In another: maybe we all have in us a secret pond where evil & ugly things germinate and grow strong, Steinbeck
    seems to be offering another explanation for evil...or maybe really not another option, but one that perhaps explains the actions of the boys in Lord of the Flies. In another story, one that King uses in his Hearts in Atlantis story, Ted, this old buck, has Bobby, a young man, read a couple stories. I believe Lord of the Flies is one of them and the other is A Separate Peace from John Knowles...or maybe I'm injecting this last into King's story...as it helped explain our actions, young boys growing up during the turbulence of the 60s. King's story, Hearts in Atlantis, truth be told, touched me like few stories have and his story should be included on the shelf with all of the stories in my post.

    I wonder if I already posted this...posted a post like this? If ever there was a wiz there was...and so on and so forth and scooby dooby dooby. Anyway...check out all the above stories if you enjoyed Lord of the Flies. For us, like Gene and Phineas in Knowles' story, we played rough because we thought we were going to war...Vietnam. So in that sense, seems like it's legitimate to wonder if in fact evil isn't fostered in a larger sense, society as a whole. And my last connection is to Arthur C Clarke's Childhood's End and the ending of that remarkable story...taking that "society as a whole" idea and looking at lemmings...that animal that rushes headlong into the sea. There's this idea I call 'the mark of zero'...maybe a tad lame...but there is present in the above stories...and others I've read, this idea that we as a group want to disappear, we want to bury our self...or Self. Clarke's story has an ending that'd I'm sure you'd enjoy in that regard.
    skimom2 likes this.
  19. Angelo Bottigliero
    Online

    Angelo Bottigliero Well-Known Member

    Yeah right :D Boys, they kick each others ass and then quickly establish some sort of pecking order. Girls though? They scheme, manipulate, lie, deceive, and are infinitely more mean and sadistic then boys.
    skimom2 likes this.
  20. skimom2
    Online

    skimom2 Just moseyin' through...

    Maybe. There are a lot of girls out there, though, that know just as much as boys about survival, and many that know more :)
    king family fan and Moderator like this.

Share This Page

Carrie: Deluxe Special Editions