A Good Marriage

  • New to the board or trying to figure out how something works here? Check out the User Guide.
  • The message board is closed between the hours of 4pm ET Friday and 8:30am ET Monday.

    As always, the Board will be open to read and those who have those privileges can still send private messages and post to Profiles.

Neesy

#1 fan (Annie Wilkes cousin) 1st cousin Mom's side
May 24, 2012
58,267
218,351
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
#22
I know there is probably a thread discussing books vs. audiobooks but I couldn't find it, so I thought I would comment here. If there is a more appropriate thread, I apologize.

I really don't like audiobooks, with no offense intended to those who do. For some reason, ever since I learned to read I have hated to be read to. In school, during presentations at work, etc., I feel somewhat insulted when someone reads to me. Now would I enjoy hearing Mr. King read L.T.'s Theory of Pets? Of course. But reading helps me escape the day to day drudgery of life in a way an audiobook could not. If I am in my car I am listening to music or sports radio.

Hope that makes sense!
Yes it does - there is a great pleasure in entering a new world in a book, even if only for a short time.
 

skimom2

Just moseyin' through...
Oct 9, 2013
15,675
92,028
USA
#24
So true Flake - happy to hear I'm in good company. It's always been this "real" kind of stuff that scares me deeply. The things that really happen in our world, and it's so very troubling. But of course, SK does a great job telling it. I got through this one last night. It'll be a while before I can take reading another one from this collection. Fortunately there's lots more SK to choose from.
This is the only short story (novella, whatever) to have ever given me a nightmare. That was the first time I read it. The second time (just a month or so ago), I couldn't sleep afterward. Really, the most deeply disturbing story I've ever read--the only ones that even come close are Best New Horror (Joe Hill) and Gotcha! (Bradbury)
 

skimom2

Just moseyin' through...
Oct 9, 2013
15,675
92,028
USA
#25
I know there is probably a thread discussing books vs. audiobooks but I couldn't find it, so I thought I would comment here. If there is a more appropriate thread, I apologize.

I really don't like audiobooks, with no offense intended to those who do. For some reason, ever since I learned to read I have hated to be read to. In school, during presentations at work, etc., I feel somewhat insulted when someone reads to me. Now would I enjoy hearing Mr. King read L.T.'s Theory of Pets? Of course. But reading helps me escape the day to day drudgery of life in a way an audiobook could not. If I am in my car I am listening to music or sports radio.

Hope that makes sense!
The only audio that have ever held my attention (and I haven't heard Mr. King read any of his) are stories by Neil Gaiman, read by the author. He has a wonderful voice, and as the author knows exactly what needs emphasis, when to speed up, slow down... he's really, really good.
 

HollyGolightly

Well-Known Member
Sep 6, 2013
9,303
70,915
49
Heart of the South
#26
This is the only short story (novella, whatever) to have ever given me a nightmare. That was the first time I read it. The second time (just a month or so ago), I couldn't sleep afterward. Really, the most deeply disturbing story I've ever read--the only ones that even come close are Best New Horror (Joe Hill) and Gotcha! (Bradbury)
Yikes - I haven't read either of those, but Joe Hill and Bradbury do scare me often.

Just the thought of the hands that have touched you, the genes that your children carry, all sullied now by criminal insanity and the horror he brought to those women and that little boy - omg - and yes, the possibility of not really knowing who you've been married to for so many years. Freaks.me.out.

I never gave much thought about the families whose lives have been upended by the horrible crimes someone they loved committed. Leave it to Sai King to go there. He so often writes about the difficult things - and with such vivid detail and real empathy. He's deeply talented.
 

Dana Jean

Moderator
Moderator
Apr 11, 2006
47,164
197,565
Thornfield
#27
The only audio that have ever held my attention (and I haven't heard Mr. King read any of his) are stories by Neil Gaiman, read by the author. He has a wonderful voice, and as the author knows exactly what needs emphasis, when to speed up, slow down... he's really, really good.
If you haven't listened to Neil read The Graveyard Book, you are missing out on a wonderful experience. I loved it.
 

skimom2

Just moseyin' through...
Oct 9, 2013
15,675
92,028
USA
#28
Yikes - I haven't read either of those, but Joe Hill and Bradbury do scare me often.

Just the thought of the hands that have touched you, the genes that your children carry, all sullied now by criminal insanity and the horror he brought to those women and that little boy - omg - and yes, the possibility of not really knowing who you've been married to for so many years. Freaks.me.out.

I never gave much thought about the families whose lives have been upended by the horrible crimes someone they loved committed. Leave it to Sai King to go there. He so often writes about the difficult things - and with such vivid detail and real empathy. He's deeply talented.
Right! I think it's only the illusion/feeling that we 'know' someone that allows us to sleep beside them...and then you read this story and are forced to acknowledge that no one knows ANYONE, not really. Hell, I don't even know why I do things sometimes, much less understand the ins and outs of someone else's head. *shudder*
 

skimom2

Just moseyin' through...
Oct 9, 2013
15,675
92,028
USA
#29
If you haven't listened to Neil read The Graveyard Book, you are missing out on a wonderful experience. I loved it.
I need to try this, then :) I've only listened to short stories so far, but I LOVE his voice. I'd actually like to hear him read The Ocean at the End of the Lane, since that was my absolute favorite read last year--no lie, I think I read it three times in a single weekend. It was astonishing, and lovely, and luminescent *happy sigh*
 

Sunlight Gardener

Well-Known Member
Jul 22, 2013
369
1,227
#30
I'm an audiobook addict. I have about 25 SK stories and I listen to them to and from work just about every day. I have a 40 minute drive and they pass the time beautifully. Even the ones that I have listened to them so many times I can quote almost every word never fail to give me pleasure when I listen.
 

NatalieJG

New Member
Nov 20, 2013
3
23
51
#31
This was amazing...and (SPOILER ALERT!)
the end sequence was just breathtaking in the way that it brought such tremendous, and poetic, closure for Darcy!
Leave to the King to scare me so badly in the first two thirds of the story that I couldn't sleep, and then--as it the story came into the home stretch--to touch me so deeply that I literally wept. This is the real deal--THIS is the kind of journey that wordsmithing should take a reader on.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

AToyStoryInCali

Well-Known Member
Nov 20, 2014
167
764
33
Worst City Ever, USA
#32
I just re-read this gem. I completely forgot how much I loved this one. I do not remember loving it this much the last go round!!!! Wow. This story is just brilliantly paced. I was so sad to see it end.
It was amazing to me how King was *almost* able to make me feel sorry for Beadie- *almost.* He was such a true psychopath. He was so descriptive in this tale, and it really put me in her shoes at every turn. For me, the icing on the entire thing was the introduction of the retired detective at the end. I loved everything about that and how it seemed to give her closure.
 

César Hernández-Meraz

Wants to be Nick, ends up as Larry
May 19, 2015
572
4,161
38
Aguascalientes, Mexico
#35
Just finished reading this (the only story I was still missing from this collection after years, not counting Under The Weather).

Before the reveal of Bob's secret early on, I wondered if she would find evidence he cheated on her. The realization of how much worse things can be was shocking. It makes me think that, yes, I may forgive unfaithfulness. But how could I forgive all these murders? I do not think I could, or should.
 

Pucker

We all have it coming, kid
May 9, 2010
2,906
6,215
57
#36
This was another good one in a collection full of them. Makes you wonder how many serial killers have some sort of rationalization to their actions.
Most, I would assume.

It's kind of a Catch-22, now I think of it.

A sane person with no motivation could probably get away with killing random people in various ways indefinitely. But a sane person wouldn't do that. The crazy person has his reasons. Count on it. They just don't seem like very good reasons to you or me.

Or maybe just you. :glare:
 
Likes: GNTLGNT
ELEVATION is now available in hardcover, ebook, and audiobook!