Almost Finished with Re-Read

  • New to the board or trying to figure out how something works here? Check out the User Guide.
  • Hot Topics is on indefinite hiatus.

  • The message board is closed between the hours of 4pm ET Friday and 8:30am ET Monday.

    As always, the Board will be open to read and those who have those privileges can still send private messages and post to Profiles.

Zone D Dad

Well-Known Member
Apr 17, 2017
358
1,786
Chicago Suburbs
#1
So I took 2 hardcover books with me on vacation last week: Bazaar of Bad Dreams and A Game of Thrones. Those are some pretty weighty titles to pack for an airline trip. For some reason, I ended up not touching either one of them because I somehow finding myself opening up my Kindle version of 'Salem's Lot. I've mentioned before that this was my first SK read, and this is now my 3rd time through it. I haven't finished it yet, but am almost there. It's such a terrific read.

I've also mentioned how I really enjoy the Tobe Hooper mini-series from way back when, and always like those moments where I find it on tv. However, I've managed to mix up some of the elements from the novel and the adaptation that I was pleased to set straight. Mainly, it's Barlow. The miniseries portrays him as a feral, Nosferatu type (which now makes me automatically think of the film What We Do in the Shadows - a must see). But in the book, he's actually a character who speaks and taunts the fearless vampire killers rather cruelly. I wish they would've explored this in the original television film. I've never seen the re-make from a few years ago as I've just assumed that it's rubbish, so I don't know if they were more true to the source in that version.
 

Coyo-T

Well-Known Member
Oct 3, 2016
67
314
#3
For what it's worth, I liked the re-make- parts of it are quite faithful adaptations of the corresponding scenes from the book, though several characters (especially the main ones) have been heavily changed to "update" them.
 

Zone D Dad

Well-Known Member
Apr 17, 2017
358
1,786
Chicago Suburbs
#4
For what it's worth, I liked the re-make- parts of it are quite faithful adaptations of the corresponding scenes from the book, though several characters (especially the main ones) have been heavily changed to "update" them.
Maybe I'll give it a day in court at some point. I have a hard time accepting Rob Lowe. Color me weird, but I love David Soul's horrible over-acting in the original. It's like the next best thing to getting William Shatner to play the role.
 

Coyo-T

Well-Known Member
Oct 3, 2016
67
314
#5
Maybe I'll give it a day in court at some point. I have a hard time accepting Rob Lowe. Color me weird, but I love David Soul's horrible over-acting in the original. It's like the next best thing to getting William Shatner to play the role.
Yeah, it doesn't help that Ben Mears is written as pretty unlikable in the remake (plus I kept "hearing" Rob Lowe's character from Moonbeam City, which actually made things kinda funny.) Some of the character changes were baffling, but it at least had people cut from the '70s version, including Dr. Cody, Dudley, and the bus driver, and a version of Barlowe more in keeping with the book (plus Eva and Weasel get just enough attention to form their own subplot, which is always a plus as far as I'm concerned.)
 

Zone D Dad

Well-Known Member
Apr 17, 2017
358
1,786
Chicago Suburbs
#7
Just finished reading this 2 nights ago, I don't usually like vampire stories but I did like Salem's Lot.

I have never seen the movie adaption :)
I think it's worthwhile (at least the old version), but it was made in like 1979 or so. As a child of the late 70s - early 80s, nostalgia tends to paint a rosy glow on things. I'd be curious to know what a first-time viewer thinks of it now.
 

Toni_S_UK

Well-Known Member
Apr 4, 2017
471
2,827
33
England UK
#8
I think it's worthwhile (at least the old version), but it was made in like 1979 or so. As a child of the late 70s - early 80s, nostalgia tends to paint a rosy glow on things. I'd be curious to know what a first-time viewer thinks of it now.
Well I did find the original online and was planning to watch it. I will see if I can pull myself away from The stand for a couple of hours to watch it. Haha. I will let you know what I think.
 

clyee0227

Active Member
Oct 3, 2017
32
82
New Orleans, LA
#10
So I took 2 hardcover books with me on vacation last week: Bazaar of Bad Dreams and A Game of Thrones. Those are some pretty weighty titles to pack for an airline trip. For some reason, I ended up not touching either one of them because I somehow finding myself opening up my Kindle version of 'Salem's Lot. I've mentioned before that this was my first SK read, and this is now my 3rd time through it. I haven't finished it yet, but am almost there. It's such a terrific read.

I've also mentioned how I really enjoy the Tobe Hooper mini-series from way back when, and always like those moments where I find it on tv. However, I've managed to mix up some of the elements from the novel and the adaptation that I was pleased to set straight. Mainly, it's Barlow. The miniseries portrays him as a feral, Nosferatu type (which now makes me automatically think of the film What We Do in the Shadows - a must see). But in the book, he's actually a character who speaks and taunts the fearless vampire killers rather cruelly. I wish they would've explored this in the original television film. I've never seen the re-make from a few years ago as I've just assumed that it's rubbish, so I don't know if they were more true to the source in that version.

I do the same exact thing myself. I've read Salem's Lot 8 times now and I seem to pick up something new every time I read it. I first read it about 30 years ago and I was in 8th or 9th grade. It has been to this day the only book that has ever given me a nightmare. (Possibly because I actually LIKE having bad dreams, which is really weird I know.) I ALWAYS ALWAYS read the books first before I see any film adaptation, whether it be big screen or TV, and until IT came out in theatres, I've always been somewhat disappointed in the film versions of his books. Especially his old stuff like Firestarter, Cujo, or Christine. Everyone would talk about how awesome the movie was and when I'd watch it I'm thinking, oh no it's not....not compared to the book! The Pet Cemetery movie was the closest to his books I think until recently.
Do you recommend Tobe Hooper as a horror writer or do you specifically like books about vampires? I've never read any of his stuff but I'll read anything that's good. Have you read Anne Rice's vampire series yet? It's highly recommended as well as her Mayfair Witch series. But of course, Stephen King has been and will always be my very favorite author to read. I preorder his books. I look forward to summer when he usually releases his new nonfiction and I'm about 1/3 the way through with "Sleeping Beauties" now.
 

Zone D Dad

Well-Known Member
Apr 17, 2017
358
1,786
Chicago Suburbs
#11
I do the same exact thing myself. I've read Salem's Lot 8 times now and I seem to pick up something new every time I read it. I first read it about 30 years ago and I was in 8th or 9th grade. It has been to this day the only book that has ever given me a nightmare. (Possibly because I actually LIKE having bad dreams, which is really weird I know.) I ALWAYS ALWAYS read the books first before I see any film adaptation, whether it be big screen or TV, and until IT came out in theatres, I've always been somewhat disappointed in the film versions of his books. Especially his old stuff like Firestarter, Cujo, or Christine. Everyone would talk about how awesome the movie was and when I'd watch it I'm thinking, oh no it's not....not compared to the book! The Pet Cemetery movie was the closest to his books I think until recently.
Do you recommend Tobe Hooper as a horror writer or do you specifically like books about vampires? I've never read any of his stuff but I'll read anything that's good. Have you read Anne Rice's vampire series yet? It's highly recommended as well as her Mayfair Witch series. But of course, Stephen King has been and will always be my very favorite author to read. I preorder his books. I look forward to summer when he usually releases his new nonfiction and I'm about 1/3 the way through with "Sleeping Beauties" now.
Tobe Hooper was an interesting cat. How on earth do you follow up a film like Texas Chainsaw Massacre? I don't have the love for it that some horror fans do, but I admire it for being absolutely insane. I think Salem's Lot was the next best thing he did (I don't count Poltergeist as that has Spielberg's hands all over it - not necessarily a bad thing mind you).

I've not read any of the Ann Rice books, as vampires aren't something that I normally seek out (Ironic, because my novel that I've been working on ad perpetuum involves vampires). Perhaps I should. I often go back to Mr. King after I play around in other sandboxes for a bit. Currently I'm reading Cormac McCarthy, who can be both great and frustrating at the same time. I'm reading All the Pretty Horses, and so far it's wildly uneven.
 

clyee0227

Active Member
Oct 3, 2017
32
82
New Orleans, LA
#12
Tobe Hooper was an interesting cat. How on earth do you follow up a film like Texas Chainsaw Massacre? I don't have the love for it that some horror fans do, but I admire it for being absolutely insane. I think Salem's Lot was the next best thing he did (I don't count Poltergeist as that has Spielberg's hands all over it - not necessarily a bad thing mind you).

I've not read any of the Ann Rice books, as vampires aren't something that I normally seek out (Ironic, because my novel that I've been working on ad perpetuum involves vampires). Perhaps I should. I often go back to Mr. King after I play around in other sandboxes for a bit. Currently I'm reading Cormac McCarthy, who can be both great and frustrating at the same time. I'm reading All the Pretty Horses, and so far it's wildly uneven.
The original The Texas Chainsaw Massacre was definitely insane for sure.....lol. I had no idea he did Salem's Lot as well. It has been sooooo long since I've even watched the original one. Or the remake for that matter. Have you ever read A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness? My husband found it in a sale bin at the book store and bought it. I had never heard of her but the book sounded interesting so I read it and absolutely loved it. It's the first in the All Souls Trilogy. Take a look at it if you haven't read it...I think you'd enjoy it.
WOW! You're writing a novel? That's pretty impressive. I know it's a lot harder to do than most people think. Especially if writing just doesn't come naturally to people, such as myself for example. Is this your first one?
 
Likes: mal

Zone D Dad

Well-Known Member
Apr 17, 2017
358
1,786
Chicago Suburbs
#13
The original The Texas Chainsaw Massacre was definitely insane for sure.....lol. I had no idea he did Salem's Lot as well. It has been sooooo long since I've even watched the original one. Or the remake for that matter. Have you ever read A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness? My husband found it in a sale bin at the book store and bought it. I had never heard of her but the book sounded interesting so I read it and absolutely loved it. It's the first in the All Souls Trilogy. Take a look at it if you haven't read it...I think you'd enjoy it.
WOW! You're writing a novel? That's pretty impressive. I know it's a lot harder to do than most people think. Especially if writing just doesn't come naturally to people, such as myself for example. Is this your first one?
Thanks for the recommendation. I'm not familiar so I'll have to check it out! The novel thing is a lot less impressive because it's my first attempt and I painted myself into a corner after about 50k words. I think I've found a way out, but it's going to require a lot of work and time that I just don't seem to have lately. I've only published exactly one short story (thank you Writer's Digest), and had a few others rejected. I keep telling myself that I'll be able to set aside some time to get back in the flow.
 
We’ve created a Stephen King Library action for the 
			  Google Assistant and skill for Amazon Alexa. It'll give 
			  you a personalized reading recommendations based on your 
			  answers to a series of questions—so what are you waiting 
			  for? Find out which Stephen King book you should read 
			  next!