Discussion 18-24: The Monkey

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fljoe0

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This thread needs a visual aid

Monkey-Cymbals.jpg
 

Spideyman

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The description of the monkey left little for the imagination ( a good thing). One scary dude!! Liked the two part feature-- Hal as a child, and as an adult. reminded me of IT. As a reader the mind kept trying to figure out better ways to get rid of the monkey. SK enjoys the use of brand names-- Ralston Purina box, Crisco tin, and the magazine Rock Wave.
 

Spideyman

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Jul 10, 2006
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A battery-operated musical jolly chimp manufactured by Daishin C.K.
A cymbal-banging monkey toy is a mechanical depiction of a monkey holding a cymbal in each hand. When activated it repeatedly bangs its cymbals together and, in some cases, bobs its head, chatters, grins, does flips, and more. There are both traditional wind-up versions as well as updated battery-operated cymbal-banging monkeys.

History[edit]
The Japanese company Daishin C.K. manufactured the classic cymbal monkey during the 1950s to 1970s under the name "Musical Jolly Chimp". It screeched and showed its teeth when its head was pressed. It had a black on/off lever on its back and came with a green arm tag.

Later versions from other toy makers copied the facial expressions but often changed the toy's outfit and name. In the mid-1960s through the early 1970s, the Japanese-manufactured "Charley Chimp" was sold by street peddlers on the streets of lower Manhattan in NYC. Other brand names include "Wind-up Monkey Playing Cymbals" from Russ, "Pepi Tumbling Monkey with Cymbal" from Yano Man Toys, "Clockwork Musical Monkey with Clashing Cymbals", "Musical Monkey", "Magic Monkey","Mister Monkey" and "Jolly Chimp". There is also one called "Charlie Chimp" from Lincoln, which is different from "Charley Chimp".

With many other companies manufacturing various versions in the United States, Hong Kong, Japan, Taiwan and the Philippines, the toy's appearance varies. The change in manufacturing countries was primarily due to factories going out of business and seeking the lowest manufacturing costs. This is still the case today. The monkey has been seen wearing red-and-white-striped pants and a yellow vest with red buttons, or red overalls and a stocking cap. Other outfits include green-striped pants, blue-striped pants, a red shirt with either green or blue pants, and plaid blue overalls. The monkeys are sometimes rendered with red rings painted around their wide-open eyes, creating an appearance some find disturbing, perhaps explaining their many appearances in horror, sci-fi and comedy media. They can also symbolize emptiness and mindlessness.

History
 

fljoe0

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Later versions from other toy makers copied the facial expressions but often changed the toy's outfit and name. In the mid-1960s through the early 1970s, the Japanese-manufactured "Charley Chimp" was sold by street peddlers on the streets of lower Manhattan in NYC.

Interesting. In the notes, Steve said he got the idea for the story when he saw these being sold on the streets of New York.
 

Doc Creed

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I've told this twenty times, but around three years old I had one of those monkeys. It'd occasionally twitch on its own, the quick buzz of inner gears like distant locusts. It was out of my reach on the chest of drawers but even then, before reading this story (or anything, for that matter), it made me uneasy. That toy and an especially sinister jack-in-the-box that had an androgynous clown face with a rictus of pleasure, caused me to sleep with one eye open.

I agree, Spidey, there are nice details with specific product names. This is one of the things about King that always helps me become immersed in his world(s).
The use of newspaper clippings, too, as with Carrie, help sell the ending. It lends credibility, in an odd way.
 

Doc Creed

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Later versions from other toy makers copied the facial expressions but often changed the toy's outfit and name. In the mid-1960s through the early 1970s, the Japanese-manufactured "Charley Chimp" was sold by street peddlers on the streets of lower Manhattan in NYC.

Interesting. In the notes, Steve said he got the idea for the story when he saw these being sold on the streets of New York.
That is interesting. Another sidenote: the lawn jockey in Duma Key is named Charlie. It's not monkey-related but it is another inanimate object coming to life. I suppose the monkey isn't completely inanimate, but...where am I? :umm:
 

Neesy

#1 fan (Annie Wilkes cousin) 1st cousin Mom's side
May 24, 2012
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This is a dandy horror story about an evil monkey toy. Steve did a nice job telling the parallel stories.

So, what did you think?
I like it - it had a few funny parts
(when he was describing Dean Martin singing and the way the kids would razz each other0
. I am pretty sure this was a new story to me - I do not recall reading this one previously.

Thought I had read it in the past, but I guess not.

Some of this story sounds like he took a few things from his own life (the older brother, the father sounded much like his life growing up).

Weirdly enough, now I think I would like to get one of those weird monkeys - yup - I know - why tempt fate? But I guess, even though I enjoyed the story, I'm not quite as superstitious as my Mom was :m_crazy:

Read this story on my iPad, hanging it over the edge of the tub so I wouldn't drop it in, while soaking in some Algemarin and eucalyptus baby wash.
 

Tery

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Apr 12, 2006
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This one scared me silly. Every time I see one of those damn monkey toys, I back away quickly.

I loved how the reader is one step ahead of the protagonist. We are dreading the next incident. In terms of hitting nails on the head -- for a horror writer/story -- this one did. One of the perfect horror stories. IMO, of course.