Ending of Cujo

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Moderator

Ms. Mod
Administrator
Jul 10, 2006
47,477
122,562
Maine
#2
I heard Stephen in an interview answer "Cujo," when asked (paraphrased), "Is there any book you'd think about changing the ending of?"

I have an idea of what Stephen might change about the ending, but I'm not sure how to talk about it without a huge spoiler.
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Jan 30, 2015
21
113
Cincinnati
#3
Here is my basic idea of how Stephen might change the ending of Cujo, if he wanted to based on my previous reading (note: I don't necessarily think he should change anything about the book, but when he was asked the question, I guess he felt some answer was warranted):

I think he might allow Tad to live. It seems that Stephen favors children getting out alive in other books. I actually expect that Tad would do so and his mom would end up mauled by Cujo, or rabid and shot by police.
 

skimom2

Just moseyin' through...
Oct 9, 2013
15,668
91,910
USA
#5
Here is my basic idea of how Stephen might change the ending of Cujo, if he wanted to based on my previous reading (note: I don't necessarily think he should change anything about the book, but when he was asked the question, I guess he felt some answer was warranted):

I think he might allow Tad to live. It seems that Stephen favors children getting out alive in other books. I actually expect that Tad would do so and his mom would end up mauled by Cujo, or rabid and shot by police.
He might mean that. And he would be wrong. The ending was wrenching and horrible, and absolutely likely. As a parent, I can't read that book anymore--it tears me up too much. But a writer of a story seated in the real physical world (even if it has fantastic elements) has to be true to what he's written earlier in the narrative and physical realities. I always admire the ones who don't 'truckle to fashion' (one of my favorite King phrases), even when it would be easy to do so.
 
Last edited:

Doc Creed

Well-Known Member
Nov 18, 2015
14,836
65,858
United States
#6
He might mean that. And he would be wrong. The ending was wrenching and horrible, and absolutely likely. As a parent, I can't read that book anymore--it tears me up too much. But a writer of a story seated in the real physical world (even if it has fantastic elements) has to be true to what he's written earlier in the narrative and physical realities. I always admire the ones who don't 'truckle for favor' (one of my favorite King phrases), even when it would be easy to do so.
100% in agreement.
 
Jan 30, 2015
21
113
Cincinnati
#7
He might mean that. And he would be wrong. The ending was wrenching and horrible, and absolutely likely. As a parent, I can't read that book anymore--it tears me up too much. But a writer of a story seated in the real physical world (even if it has fantastic elements) has to be true to what he's written earlier in the narrative and physical realities. I always admire the ones who don't 'truckle for favor' (one of my favorite King phrases), even when it would be easy to do so.
It would be interesting to know what was in King's mind when he named Cujo as the ending he might redo (again, I still don't think he would!). However, it seems that the ending it currently has is the most realistic, given the situation.

Of course, Stephen would never actually say what alternate ending he might have meant, and that's as it should be.
 

mal

Well-Known Member
Jun 23, 2007
3,404
18,424
56
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
#11
I have a thing about watching SK movies. I have seen a few (The Shining, Delores Claiborn, Misery), but I generally don't like to. And never before I read the book. :)

Do you remember what the ending was?
I think the kid
lived
.But again, I haven't watched it in years and I'm going on faulty memory.
 

skimom2

Just moseyin' through...
Oct 9, 2013
15,668
91,910
USA
#13
I have a thing about watching SK movies. I have seen a few (The Shining, Delores Claiborn, Misery), but I generally don't like to. And never before I read the book. :)

Do you remember what the ending was?
The mom killed the dog, found the kid limp in the car, splashed a little water on his face and he miraculously revived and everyone was happy slappy. Stupid ending.
 

muskrat

Dis-Member
Nov 8, 2010
4,486
19,225
Under your bed
#14
He might mean that. And he would be wrong. The ending was wrenching and horrible, and absolutely likely. As a parent, I can't read that book anymore--it tears me up too much. But a writer of a story seated in the real physical world (even if it has fantastic elements) has to be true to what he's written earlier in the narrative and physical realities. I always admire the ones who don't 'truckle to fashion' (one of my favorite King phrases), even when it would be easy to do so.
 

Dynamo

Well-Known Member
May 12, 2017
90
287
38
Denton, TX
#15
I'm a sucker for happy endings but the ending is probably the most interesting thing about Cujo in my opinion. Not that I dislike the book but it's also not one of my favorites. Without the ending I don't think I would like it though as the ending ties the whole thing together as a slow-motion trainwreck/tragedy. I can think of quite a few kids who died in King's novels that I don't think he has too much of a problem disposing of them. I almost always expect kids and dogs in his books to meet a terrible end. The main thing about it I'd change is the supernatural aspect. I don't remember exactly but the book does more than just imply that there's some sort of underlying evil causing this to take place doesn't it? The monster in the little boy's closet which may or may not be associated with Frank Dodd. I think a rabid Saint Bernard is a frightening enough antagonist that the boogeyman angle is unnecessary. It's a scary scenario because it's so real and doesn't need any help from the supernatural world.
 
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