Had Fun Reading This Over The Weekend

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ghost19

"Have I run too far to get home?"
Sep 25, 2011
8,172
50,027
45
Arkansas
#2
Great little book! I know that there must have been some who objected to the ending of this, but I loved it. I also loved the way that SK made the small Maine island community come to life.
It's a great book. Leaves you scratching your head and wanting another chapter or three.....
 

Lisey Landon

Well-Known Member
May 20, 2009
754
3,960
Germany
#5
Great little book! I know that there must have been some who objected to the ending of this, but I loved it. I also loved the way that SK made the small Maine island community come to life.
I loved the book, until the ending. After finishing I was very angry with Mr. King.::P
It is one of the few King books that I have read just once.
 

skimom2

Just moseyin' through...
Oct 9, 2013
15,668
91,933
USA
#9
I just finished this one yesterday! I really enjoyed the whole thing, including the ending. Part of the thrust of the story was that life isn't a neat little package--we usually don't know how anything turns out. But we still keep chugging along, looking for answers where there are none. Maybe it was a little bit of a warning: don't trust anything that seems too 'neat'? At any rate, it was a first rate story!
 

OKKingFan

Well-Known Member
Jun 15, 2013
125
288
Oklahoma
#13
I'm with you Lisey...if I want something with no neat ending, I have life...in my books, I want endings. After having just read the Dark Tower, I'm thinking part of the reason why this is a mystery has to do with the ideas presented in the Dark Tower. But that doesn't make the Colorado Kid any better of a book. Probably my least favorite King novel.
 

Jvandy57

New Member
Jan 9, 2014
1
8
61
#14
I've avoided reading it because I love Haven. I want to read it now because I figure Haven has taken the storyline way past the original story. What do y'all think? Would reading The Colorado Kid ruin Haven?
I read this over the last two days BECAUSE of Haven. I bought a Kindle so I could read this book and not pay $30 for a used copy. (I know that sounds stupid) Anyway, I am an avid Haven fan and the words ""based on the book "The Colorado Kid" by Stephen King" at the beginning of the show made me read it. The Afterward in the book actually really had me thinking...Is Haven beyond the book? Answer: Absolutely! The question however is, What is MYSTERY? Freaking Priceless!!
 

FlakeNoir

Original Kiwi© SKMB®
Moderator
Apr 11, 2006
41,526
162,059
New Zealand
#15
I read this over the last two days BECAUSE of Haven. I bought a Kindle so I could read this book and not pay $30 for a used copy. (I know that sounds stupid) Anyway, I am an avid Haven fan and the words ""based on the book "The Colorado Kid" by Stephen King" at the beginning of the show made me read it. The Afterward in the book actually really had me thinking...Is Haven beyond the book? Answer: Absolutely! The question however is, What is MYSTERY? Freaking Priceless!!
Welcome to the site, I've never seen Haven, but did enjoy Colorado Kid... good to have you here with us. :)
 

Sunlight Gardener

Well-Known Member
Jul 22, 2013
369
1,217
#16
The thing about Colorado Kid is that Vince and Dave warn Stephanie (as well as the reader) right up front that she (you) won't be satisfied with the lack of conclusion in the story. I was prepared for it and therefore wasn't too disappointed. I enjoy going back and reading it now because I there are always aspects to the case that I missed out on the first and second time through.
 

Boni

Well-Known Member
Dec 26, 2008
369
333
#17
We don't always get answers in real life too. Think about Bermuda Triagle, the Dyatlov Passage, and so many other dark stories that we will probably never find out what happened. The Colorado Kid is this. A book about the essence of the mystery. If you read it expecting a resolution, you'll fail to like it. I don't think it's a bad book, because it's a very sincere one. It never lies to the reader saying that we will get to know the answers.
 

morgan

Well-Known Member
Jul 11, 2010
28,790
100,523
North Dakota
#18
We don't always get answers in real life too. Think about Bermuda Triagle, the Dyatlov Passage, and so many other dark stories that we will probably never find out what happened. The Colorado Kid is this. A book about the essence of the mystery. If you read it expecting a resolution, you'll fail to like it. I don't think it's a bad book, because it's a very sincere one. It never lies to the reader saying that we will get to know the answers.
I'd never heard of the Dyatlov Passage and looked it up-fascinating mystery!
 

Houdini

Well-Known Member
Aug 15, 2014
295
1,412
USA
#19
The thing I remember from this book is the waitress that's going home to "ret up her place". This is the 1st instance I've ever seen this eastern phrase used in a book. You ask anybody in the midwest what "retting up" is they'd have no clue at all but everyone on the east coast uses it on a routine basis. Funny the things that stay with you.

Houdini in Omaha
 

Houdini

Well-Known Member
Aug 15, 2014
295
1,412
USA
#20
A sample of Pittsburghese:

The language of the early Scots-Irish settlers had the greatest influence on the speech of southwestern and western Pennsylvania. This influence is reflected mainly in the retention of certain lexical items (cruds or cruddled milk (cottage cheese), hap (comforter), jag (to tease or annoy), jag around (to fool around or act foolishly), jagger (a thorn or burr), jagoff (an annoying or irritating person), neb/nebby/neb-nose (nosy), redd up (to clean), slippy (slippery), yinz/yunz/you’uns (second-person plural), "punctual" whenever and possibly "positive" anymore and reversed usage of leave and let, but also in the like, need, or want + past participle grammatical constructions i.e. 'the yard needs mowed' and the discourse marker '‘n’at," literally meaning "and that" (e.g. "The yard n'at needs mowed," meaning "the yard and surrounding areas need to be mowed.") According to a study based only on pronunciation, the dialect region of western Pennsylvania ranges north to Erie, Pennsylvania, west to Youngstown, Ohio, south to Clarksburg, West Virginia, and east to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania (Labov, Ash and Boberg 2005), but different features may be differently distributed.

Having a wife from Pittsburgh all these phrases are becoming well known to me.

Hougini in Omaha
 
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