Loved Duma Key (possible spoilers)

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William8675309

Well-Known Member
Mar 9, 2018
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I just finished this book and absolutely loved it. Every page was amazing from the slow burn start getting to know Duma and Edgar's soon to be compananos to the last "how to Draw". I was sad for it to end.
For some reason Wireman was Raul Julia for me. I know in Addams Family he spoke French but it was him I saw in Wireman. (I would love King to take up the theme of a true "Pirates of the Caribean" themed/style ghost story.)
 

Doc Creed

Well-Known Member
Nov 18, 2015
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I just finished this book and absolutely loved it. Every page was amazing from the slow burn start getting to know Duma and Edgar's soon to be compananos to the last "how to Draw". I was sad for it to end.
For some reason Wireman was Raul Julia for me. I know in Addams Family he spoke French but it was him I saw in Wireman. (I would love King to take up the theme of a true "Pirates of the Caribean" themed/style ghost story.)
Maybe sì, maybe no. Hmm, interesting idea.

Welcome, William. How's Jenny these days? ;)
 

Aija

Active Member
Nov 7, 2007
25
77
Norway
Hello again
I have read, mostly listened to, “Duma Key” several times, but there is one thing that I don’t quite understand.
When Edgards daughter dies, is murdered , and Edgar goes out on the beach with the broom; what happens, and what does it mean?
Miss Freemantel said “ You want to but you shouldn’t”
He, Edgar draws his daughter (?) to bring her back I guess, but the meaning eludes me
 
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Doc Creed

Well-Known Member
Nov 18, 2015
16,422
77,192
42
United States
Hello again
I have read, mostly listened to, “Duma Key” several times, but there is one thing that I don’t quite understand.
When Edgards daughter dies, is murdered , and Edgar goes out on the beach with the broom; what happens, and what does it mean?
Miss Freemantel said “ You want to but you shouldn’t”
He, Edgar draws his daughter (?) to bring her back I guess, but the meaning eludes me
Hi, Aija.
I think you're referring to the scene on the beach outside of Big Pink when Ilsa appears in a sand formation- nebulous and ghostly. If I remember correctly, she disintegrated almost as quickly as she appeared. I interpreted this as the inconstancy of time and life itself. It's a mysterious scene (and a mysterious book) but I think it could be a poetic way for King to express the emotion of Edgar learning one cannot possess (or keep) another person forever; even while they are alive, our loved ones are on loan to us, so to speak. All flesh is as grass which withers and blows away. Not to beat a metaphor to death, but think about sand through the hourglass or the impermanence of a life, like sandcastles being washed away into the sea. That's my take.
 
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RichardX

Well-Known Member
Sep 26, 2006
1,702
4,249
There was a comparison noted in a recent review of Haruki Murakami's "Killing Commendatore"with "Duma Key." Similar themes about art. Murakami is not for everyone but he is in my opinion the best fiction writer around these days. So his books are definitely worth a try.
 

Aija

Active Member
Nov 7, 2007
25
77
Norway
There was a comparison noted in a recent review of Haruki Murakami's "Killing Commendatore"with "Duma Key." Similar themes about art. Murakami is not for everyone but he is in my opinion the best fiction writer around these days. So his books are definitely worth a try.
Always nice with new recommendations , and when it is from fellow King enthusiasts, I check them out every time . Thank you Richard x
 
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Aija

Active Member
Nov 7, 2007
25
77
Norway
Hi, Aija.
I think you're referring to the scene on the beach outside of Big Pink when Ilsa appears in a sand formation- nebulous and ghostly. If I remember correctly, she disintegrated almost as quickly as she appeared. I interpreted this as the inconstancy of time and life itself. It's a mysterious scene (and a mysterious book) but I think it could be a poetic way for King to express the emotion of Edgar learning one cannot possess (or keep) another person forever; even while they are alive, our loved ones are on loan to us, so to speak. All flesh is as grass which withers and blows away. Not to beat a metaphor to death, but think about sand through the hourglass or the impermanence of a life, like sandcastles being washed away into the sea. That's my take.
Thank you Don Greed for your reply. Your explanation do make sense, I was myself also thinking about to learn to let go; of marriage, of his life before and now his daughter. But your way to put is way more elegant and explanatory on an deeper level. Now I’m going to read that scene (?) again :)
 

GNTLGNT

The idiot is IN
Jun 15, 2007
84,951
338,727
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Cambridge, Ohio
Thank you Don Greed for your reply. Your explanation do make sense, I was myself also thinking about to learn to let go; of marriage, of his life before and now his daughter. But your way to put is way more elegant and explanatory on an deeper level. Now I’m going to read that scene (?) again :)
....forever more, Doc will now be "Don".....;-D
 
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