Question about page 330

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lyblyb14

New Member
Jan 11, 2014
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Hi,
Maybe this just went over my head and I didn't understand it, but on page 330 there appears to be a huge error in the book. I'm sorry I don't have the book in front of me, but it's the bit when Lisey is thinking how sorry (or afraid?) she is for the ten year old boy, even though she knows he survived to father the man lying beside her now. Or words to that effect. Yet the ten year old boy of the past and the man in the present are both Scott. What have I missed here? Can someone explain please?
 

FlakeNoir

Original Kiwi© SKMB®
Moderator
Apr 11, 2006
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New Zealand
Welcome to the site. I have it in front of me now, the piece reads:

'Oh Scott', she says. She is afraid for the ten-year-old boy even though she knows it must have come out all right; knows he lived to father the young man lying beside her.

I haven't read much either side of that passage and it has been a long time since reading the book, so I may have missed something, but the piece does seem confusing to me as well.

Somebody else?
 

Walter Oobleck

keeps coming back...or going, and going, and going
Mar 6, 2013
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This the Lisey and the Pool chapter? XI.? The sentence is not on my page 330 reason I ask. Don't take the word father so literally and consider the word in the context of the story, what has been asked of Scott, what his father was like, what transpired between Scott and his father...and his brother.
 

FlakeNoir

Original Kiwi© SKMB®
Moderator
Apr 11, 2006
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This the Lisey and the Pool chapter? XI.? The sentence is not on my page 330 reason I ask. Don't take the word father so literally and consider the word in the context of the story, what has been asked of Scott, what his father was like, what transpired between Scott and his father...and his brother.
It's in Ten: Lisey and the Arguments Against Instanity (The Good Brother)
 

Walter Oobleck

keeps coming back...or going, and going, and going
Mar 6, 2013
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oh okay...page 298 in my hard-cover...have the sentence underlined. I'll repeat what I posted above, don't take the word father so literally and consider that word with another key word from the sentence, survived...and the reasons why that is so...from the context of the story.
 

wpeters

New Member
Feb 6, 2017
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I guess we could read anything symbolically, but the rest of the language in the book seems quite simple and literal. Anyways, I guess we will never know! It just so clearly made me stop and rewind when I was listening so I wanted to know if there was ever an exclamation out there online!
 
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GNTLGNT

The idiot is IN
Jun 15, 2007
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I just came to that part (listening on CD and rewound a few times) and starting googling to see if anyone else caught and had a good explanation. To me it seems like an odd error.
hi-kent-logo.png
 

skimom2

Just moseyin' through...
Oct 9, 2013
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I guess we could read anything symbolically, but the rest of the language in the book seems quite simple and literal. Anyways, I guess we will never know! It just so clearly made me stop and rewind when I was listening so I wanted to know if there was ever an exclamation out there online!
Mr. King can be quite poetic at times. I'm 100% sure he meant the child 'fathered' the man.
 

recitador

Speed Reader
Sep 3, 2016
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this is one thing i actually remember from high school english. the boy is father to the man in the sense that the boys experiences shape the man he becomes. i have no idea why that specific time i answered a question correctly in english class is such a clear memory lol. i don't even remember where the teacher was quoting from, but i remember the quote.
 

carrie's younger brother

Well-Known Member
Mar 8, 2012
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Please see my editorial below in red.

'Oh Scott', she says. She is afraid for the ten-year-old boy (her husband at that age in time) even though she knows it must have come out all right; knows he lived to father the young man lying beside her (her husband now).


Lisey is thinking about her husband when he was younger and is afraid for him even though she knows he lived through whatever and became the adult many lying beside her. Hope this helps.