Question: how does your interpretation of It differ from the films?

  • This message board permanently closed on June 30th, 2020 at 4PM EDT and is no longer accepting new members.

mal

content
Jun 23, 2007
4,714
27,243
58
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Interesting question. We all keep different images in our heads while reading, even though the story is familiar to everyone. A nice experiment would be to have several of your friends read some of 'IT' (or some other character driven piece), and have them privately describe the people to you (and possibly their motivations and surroundings as well). For some reason, when I read the Mr. Mercedes trilogy, Bill Hodges was a black man.
 

osnafrank

Well-Known Member
Jan 24, 2017
7,121
50,822
45
Germany
Interesting question. We all keep different images in our heads while reading, even though the story is familiar to everyone. A nice experiment would be to have several of your friends read some of 'IT' (or some other character driven piece), and have them privately describe the people to you (and possibly their motivations and surroundings as well). For some reason, when I read the Mr. Mercedes trilogy, Bill Hodges was a black man.

When i read Pet Sematary, Jud was always a black guy (especially MorganFreeman) to me.
 

César Hernández-Meraz

Wants to be Nick, ends up as Larry
May 19, 2015
605
4,416
41
Aguascalientes, Mexico
Eddie, in my mind, is more childish and frail-looking. I think the miniseries got him exactly right. Jack Dylan seems kind of more mature to me (even if he is always goofing off on his Instagram). His face features and his expressions show me almost an adult man in a small size.

Stan, being the youngest, does not look like it in the movie. I actually think Wyatt may be the most precocious of the kids, maybe even of the not-so-kids, but not in the way a young-but-very-stern Stan would be.

And, of course, the fact everyone is older in the movie. I think even Georgie is older than he should be. When the 11 year olds are raised to 13-14 and the 12 year olds go to 15-16, everything is automatically different from the book. Instead of kids, these are teens. It could be a little more realistic if they were fighting a more down-to-Earth physical monster, but It requires qualities that may already be fading by the time many approach 14 years of age.
 

raperm

Active Member
Aug 22, 2016
28
112
50
I pretty much have that problem with any movie based on a book; the characters never quite look as I imagined them. Young Ben from the new films is pretty close. But the rest, not so much. That's always how it goes, though, and I'm okay with it.