The House. The Lake. The Writer.

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Terry Sarick

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Jun 8, 2015
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The simplest, and I mean the Patmos-theme, of meanings is thought of beyond the thicket where only the mind-efficiency of a man-in-a-situation who is one-legged and angry could transdeem the snows into the rain smiling all the way to the sun-shine. SK makes me smile.
 

bobledrew

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May 13, 2010
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Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
I think there are a few answers to this question, and I think you will see a Kingcast about this before too long.

King has filtered his own experiences through his fiction. His early fiction has a lot of stories about laundries and teaching. Surprise : he taught, and he (and his mom, IIRC) worked in industrial laundries.

His earlier fiction deals with young children and parents ; as he's aged, protagonists have too.

The other side of this is where HE tAKES that knowledge. He's not transcribing his life. And he is using his fiction to comment on serious issues. Carrie: 'in' and 'out' ness; Duma Key: the nature of creativity ; Lisey's Story : marriage and sanity. And so on.

There's a lot going on on King no matter what the occupation of his hero may be.
 
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bobledrew

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May 13, 2010
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Yep. I mentioned this in another thread and I am also wondering why no one noticed the prime numbers mistakes before he published Dreamcatcher (his editor/publisher/wife/whatever).
However, writing about writers puts his novels in the meta level and he might be accused he doesn't write about today's society, like Steinbeck did in his time.
What are the prime number mistakes to which you refer, Cristian M ?
 
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Arbitrary Refrain

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Jan 5, 2016
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From what I've seen in his speeches etc, he strikes me as a very intuitive artist and by his own admission he tries to avoid too much research because it delays or interrupts his writing process (From A Buick 8 and 11/22/63 being obvious exceptions that spring to mind). I have noticed the frequency of the protagonist being a writer in his novels, but I've always accepted the fact that he is using what he is comfortable with/knowledgeable about as a launchpad for his ideas. Off the top of my head, in his stories it is rare that the character being 'a writer' is a vital characteristic that the story arc depends upon - more often than not it is just used as a starting point to deepen the backstory, create a setting, etc.