The Little Green God of Agony

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Rrty

Well-Known Member
Jun 4, 2007
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It's hard sometimes to remember what one has previously posted, but I'm pretty sure I did not already mention this (if I have, please forgive me).

Just wanted to mention that some weeks ago I read this story, and I enjoyed it. Sure, not the deepest mythology King has created, but it fits with the other stories I've read in the collection so far -- it's entertaining, and it is backed by a good premise. This book definitely compares very favorably to Night Shift -- did anyone think that was even possible? All of King's collections are excellent, but usually most cannot compare to his first one, so this is a very cool thing.
 

AnnaMarie

Well-Known Member
Feb 16, 2012
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I'm still reading this one. Glad there were no spoilers here (would have been my own fault for opening the thread...but still glad.)

I liked this story much better in bobd than I did in the graphic novel form. I just don't do graphic novels and I thought the story was much creepier.

Graphic novel? In my day we called them comics....and they were funny.

Ain't nothing funny are this one so far.
 

katydid

New Member
Nov 11, 2006
2
9
Littleton, Colorado
My takeaway was that the story was about perceptions -- the perceptions of those who felt pain versus those who did not, and how perhaps pain can morph into something far more dangerous and alive (agony) when it is felt over a long period of time. When the pain was unleashed, everyone in the room was changed by it. Before it was unleashed, only the one victim ...
 

Pucker

We all have it coming, kid
May 9, 2010
2,906
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My takeaway was that the story was about perceptions -- the perceptions of those who felt pain versus those who did not, and how perhaps pain can morph into something far more dangerous and alive (agony) when it is felt over a long period of time. When the pain was unleashed, everyone in the room was changed by it. Before it was unleashed, only the one victim ...
I don't know that it's any great revelation that misery loves company.

This notion of pain having to go somewhere is universal.

I like this story because it reduces that singular notion to a process. We would like to surgically remove our pain ... but we can't. We can get rid of it, by allowing it to go hurt someone else -- and some of us are very adept at that -- but we cannot destroy it.

More pity, us.