Using this book in Class

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William8675309

Well-Known Member
Mar 9, 2018
85
373
52
This may be a stretch. I'm using Night Shift in a GED class I'm teaching as an example of Short Story format. It's an all levels class so there could be some Post HS students in class as well. Now I just need to cobble together some lesson plans and writing assignments to keep them busy 4 days a week for 8 weeks (32 classes). I plan do do some reading aloud obviously, vocabulary as it comes up in various stories and writing on the computer, review sentence structure, grammar etc. Trying to think of some writing topics right now. Any teachers out there have any ideas to round out lesson plans/scope and sequence for something like this? Not sure its been done very often so I'm making it up as I go. Grade level will be 6-12 or thereabout. I'd like it to be fun as well as educational and of course popular so that I can do something like it again. Peace
 

Nomik

Carry on
Jun 19, 2016
4,082
22,546
42
Derry, NH
This may be a stretch. I'm using Night Shift in a GED class I'm teaching as an example of Short Story format. It's an all levels class so there could be some Post HS students in class as well. Now I just need to cobble together some lesson plans and writing assignments to keep them busy 4 days a week for 8 weeks (32 classes). I plan do do some reading aloud obviously, vocabulary as it comes up in various stories and writing on the computer, review sentence structure, grammar etc. Trying to think of some writing topics right now. Any teachers out there have any ideas to round out lesson plans/scope and sequence for something like this? Not sure its been done very often so I'm making it up as I go. Grade level will be 6-12 or thereabout. I'd like it to be fun as well as educational and of course popular so that I can do something like it again. Peace
If they’re over 18 I don’t think you have a problem with it and it’s not a stretch. I also teach adults but they are refugees and speak mostly Swahili, Portuguese, Spanish so I don’t think I could do a Stephen King book with them, but I’d love to!
 

skimom2

Just moseyin' through...
Oct 9, 2013
15,683
92,141
USA
This may be a stretch. I'm using Night Shift in a GED class I'm teaching as an example of Short Story format. It's an all levels class so there could be some Post HS students in class as well. Now I just need to cobble together some lesson plans and writing assignments to keep them busy 4 days a week for 8 weeks (32 classes). I plan do do some reading aloud obviously, vocabulary as it comes up in various stories and writing on the computer, review sentence structure, grammar etc. Trying to think of some writing topics right now. Any teachers out there have any ideas to round out lesson plans/scope and sequence for something like this? Not sure its been done very often so I'm making it up as I go. Grade level will be 6-12 or thereabout. I'd like it to be fun as well as educational and of course popular so that I can do something like it again. Peace
It might be most useful if you pick one aspect of each story to focus on at first: characterization, plotting, setting, dialogue (my favorite with Mr. King--he really is one of the best out there), etc. Different stories are stronger in each of these aspects. As you progress, you can start looking at multiple aspects in a single story and how they act together. It's a good time/way to start them thinking about style, as well. it is the particular combinations each author typically uses that creates their style. :) Your students are very lucky to have you!
 

GNTLGNT

The idiot is IN
Jun 15, 2007
85,705
344,505
57
Cambridge, Ohio
It might be most useful if you pick one aspect of each story to focus on at first: characterization, plotting, setting, dialogue (my favorite with Mr. King--he really is one of the best out there), etc. Different stories are stronger in each of these aspects. As you progress, you can start looking at multiple aspects in a single story and how they act together. It's a good time/way to start them thinking about style, as well. it is the particular combinations each author typically uses that creates their style. :) Your students are very lucky to have you!
...HI HONEY!!!!!!.....
 

Rrty

Well-Known Member
Jun 4, 2007
1,329
4,212
I assume you're all set and don't need any further suggestions, but I'll just point out one interesting thing (interesting to me, anyway). I'm sure you know the story Gray Matter (obviously you know of it, but I mean you are probably very familiar with it). Perhaps, in some way, you could isolate the paragraph within that tale about the spider for a lesson. That paragraph, I've always said, is a great example of micro-fiction. Since the Internet has made flash fiction such a popular genre, your students will perhaps find it instructive and fun. That little tale shows King's incredible skill. Maybe the students could write a similar paragraph-sized story as an exercise...
 
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