What Are You Reading? Part Deux

  • New to the board or trying to figure out how something works here? Check out the User Guide.
  • New 2019 Hours: The message board is closed between the hours of 4pm ET Thursday and 8:30am ET Tuesday.

    As always, the Board will be open to read and those who have those privileges can still send private messages and post to Profiles.

skimom2

Just moseyin' through...
Oct 9, 2013
15,675
92,051
USA
I have a serious question for my bookish friends. Here's the situation: I've just finished a book for review. The story is a crime drama along the lines of (WHEN WILL THIS END) Gone Girl. One thing seems to be the situation, then there's a twist that changes the story completely. Whatever. (Can you tell I'm getting very tired of these stories--lol) Anyway, in the last 4--yes 4--pages of the book, the story changes again. Changes genre. A crime drama becomes a supernatural story.

So.

Does this seem right to you? The story is well written otherwise, in fact, some of his wording and pacing reminds me strongly of Mr. King. I think I could accept this twist in a short story, but in a novel it makes me want to do an Annie Wilkes ("It's a cockadoodie cheat!"). I owe a review on it soon, and I'm stumped as to what I'm going to say.

What say you? Fair or not fair story development?
 

GNTLGNT

The idiot is IN
Jun 15, 2007
84,951
338,722
57
Cambridge, Ohio
I have a serious question for my bookish friends. Here's the situation: I've just finished a book for review. The story is a crime drama along the lines of (WHEN WILL THIS END) Gone Girl. One thing seems to be the situation, then there's a twist that changes the story completely. Whatever. (Can you tell I'm getting very tired of these stories--lol) Anyway, in the last 4--yes 4--pages of the book, the story changes again. Changes genre. A crime drama becomes a supernatural story.

So.

Does this seem right to you? The story is well written otherwise, in fact, some of his wording and pacing reminds me strongly of Mr. King. I think I could accept this twist in a short story, but in a novel it makes me want to do an Annie Wilkes ("It's a cockadoodie cheat!"). I owe a review on it soon, and I'm stumped as to what I'm going to say.

What say you? Fair or not fair story development?
...no, that's a cheat....a literary jump scare if you will...nail em on it...that's just cheap hacking right there..,
 

Zone D Dad

Well-Known Member
Apr 17, 2017
359
1,817
Chicago Suburbs
I have a serious question for my bookish friends. Here's the situation: I've just finished a book for review. The story is a crime drama along the lines of (WHEN WILL THIS END) Gone Girl. One thing seems to be the situation, then there's a twist that changes the story completely. Whatever. (Can you tell I'm getting very tired of these stories--lol) Anyway, in the last 4--yes 4--pages of the book, the story changes again. Changes genre. A crime drama becomes a supernatural story.

So.

Does this seem right to you? The story is well written otherwise, in fact, some of his wording and pacing reminds me strongly of Mr. King. I think I could accept this twist in a short story, but in a novel it makes me want to do an Annie Wilkes ("It's a cockadoodie cheat!"). I owe a review on it soon, and I'm stumped as to what I'm going to say.

What say you? Fair or not fair story development?
Did the author foreshadow the hell out of it? I would have a hard time with that coming out of the blue. It may as well be "...and it was all just a dream"?
 

skimom2

Just moseyin' through...
Oct 9, 2013
15,675
92,051
USA
Did the author foreshadow the hell out of it? I would have a hard time with that coming out of the blue. It may as well be "...and it was all just a dream"?
No, not at all. In fact, a completely different explanation was foreshadowed. This feels like a publishing house or editor 'fix' for a book that peaked too early--revealed its twist. My guess is that the publisher wanted a longer book and 'suggested' this ending rather than have the writer build up more in the middle. That would likely require another edit, to make sure that it fit with what came before and after, and thus cost more than tacking on this ending. Hey, a crap last act--I mean TWIST--worked out for Gone Girl, right? *sigh*
 

kingricefan

All-being, keeper of Space, Time & Dimension.
Jul 11, 2006
29,212
121,700
Spokane, WA
I'm reading this month's book club selection and I just don't like it. It's poorly written and I just don't care about the characters. They don't feel or act realistically and it's really frustrating me. Oh, and did I mention that Wednesday night is my book club meeting and the author, who lives locally, will be in attendance?:facepalm_smiley: I'm starting to think about not going, but I would hate to do that to the hostess. I am going to have to find something nice to say about this book before 7pm Wednesday. Wish me luck!

skimom2 - any advice?
Tell the author there weren't any typos.....;-D
 

kingricefan

All-being, keeper of Space, Time & Dimension.
Jul 11, 2006
29,212
121,700
Spokane, WA
I have a serious question for my bookish friends. Here's the situation: I've just finished a book for review. The story is a crime drama along the lines of (WHEN WILL THIS END) Gone Girl. One thing seems to be the situation, then there's a twist that changes the story completely. Whatever. (Can you tell I'm getting very tired of these stories--lol) Anyway, in the last 4--yes 4--pages of the book, the story changes again. Changes genre. A crime drama becomes a supernatural story.

So.

Does this seem right to you? The story is well written otherwise, in fact, some of his wording and pacing reminds me strongly of Mr. King. I think I could accept this twist in a short story, but in a novel it makes me want to do an Annie Wilkes ("It's a cockadoodie cheat!"). I owe a review on it soon, and I'm stumped as to what I'm going to say.

What say you? Fair or not fair story development?
This is sort of what happens in The Story Of Edgar Sawtelle, isn't it? Except it wasn't in the last 4 pages. In Edgar it was done skillfully so I was able to swallow what happened. In your case, was the change done so that there can now be a sequel? We all know how publishers suffer from sequel-itis, right? Regardless, you should just tell the truth and say it doesn't hold up at the very end.
 

recitador

Speed Reader
Sep 3, 2016
1,704
7,949
36
I have a serious question for my bookish friends. Here's the situation: I've just finished a book for review. The story is a crime drama along the lines of (WHEN WILL THIS END) Gone Girl. One thing seems to be the situation, then there's a twist that changes the story completely. Whatever. (Can you tell I'm getting very tired of these stories--lol) Anyway, in the last 4--yes 4--pages of the book, the story changes again. Changes genre. A crime drama becomes a supernatural story.

So.

Does this seem right to you? The story is well written otherwise, in fact, some of his wording and pacing reminds me strongly of Mr. King. I think I could accept this twist in a short story, but in a novel it makes me want to do an Annie Wilkes ("It's a cockadoodie cheat!"). I owe a review on it soon, and I'm stumped as to what I'm going to say.

What say you? Fair or not fair story development?
that's a hard call without reading it, but that does seem like a weird switch up to do that late in the book. usually books hit their last twist a bit sooner than that, so i can see why it would seem just sort of stuck on the end.
 

do1you9love?

Happy to be here!
Feb 18, 2012
8,822
66,060
Virginia
I have a serious question for my bookish friends. Here's the situation: I've just finished a book for review. The story is a crime drama along the lines of (WHEN WILL THIS END) Gone Girl. One thing seems to be the situation, then there's a twist that changes the story completely. Whatever. (Can you tell I'm getting very tired of these stories--lol) Anyway, in the last 4--yes 4--pages of the book, the story changes again. Changes genre. A crime drama becomes a supernatural story.

So.

Does this seem right to you? The story is well written otherwise, in fact, some of his wording and pacing reminds me strongly of Mr. King. I think I could accept this twist in a short story, but in a novel it makes me want to do an Annie Wilkes ("It's a cockadoodie cheat!"). I owe a review on it soon, and I'm stumped as to what I'm going to say.

What say you? Fair or not fair story development?
Wow! No, not fair and I agree that it was probably tacked on at the end. I would call them on the many and too late twists. That's supposed to be how we learn.

Too funny that I came hear for your suggestions! Good luck!
 
Mar 12, 2010
6,539
28,992
Texas
I'm reading this month's book club selection and I just don't like it. It's poorly written and I just don't care about the characters. They don't feel or act realistically and it's really frustrating me. Oh, and did I mention that Wednesday night is my book club meeting and the author, who lives locally, will be in attendance?:facepalm_smiley: I'm starting to think about not going, but I would hate to do that to the hostess. I am going to have to find something nice to say about this book before 7pm Wednesday. Wish me luck!

skimom2 - any advice?
Maybe you could pretend you thought something was interesting and talk about it (a description of a scene, a relationship between two characters, something a character did, an event that surprised you - even if it didn't lol).
 
Mar 12, 2010
6,539
28,992
Texas
I have a serious question for my bookish friends. Here's the situation: I've just finished a book for review. The story is a crime drama along the lines of (WHEN WILL THIS END) Gone Girl. One thing seems to be the situation, then there's a twist that changes the story completely. Whatever. (Can you tell I'm getting very tired of these stories--lol) Anyway, in the last 4--yes 4--pages of the book, the story changes again. Changes genre. A crime drama becomes a supernatural story.

So.

Does this seem right to you? The story is well written otherwise, in fact, some of his wording and pacing reminds me strongly of Mr. King. I think I could accept this twist in a short story, but in a novel it makes me want to do an Annie Wilkes ("It's a cockadoodie cheat!"). I owe a review on it soon, and I'm stumped as to what I'm going to say.

What say you? Fair or not fair story development?
Not fair. I was reading a mystery series in which four sisters solved crimes. Two of the sisters had minor somewhat paranormal abilities - one mixed healing herbs, the other made jewelry with stones that supposedly had mystical properties. i was really enjoying the series until half the characters developed major paranormal abilities with fire bombs and such. I quit reading it :(

Paranormal seems to be popular right now. Maybe the publisher wanted to jump on the bandwagon.
 
Mar 12, 2010
6,539
28,992
Texas
I finished reading the Maze Runners series and loved it :) it combined my two favorite genres - post-apocalyptic and mystery. The story was good. The characters each had their own developed personalities. The story had a beginning, a middle and an end. (I do NOT like stories that leave the ending up to the reader lol).

Thank you for mentioning the series do1 :) and thank you do1's daughter for discussing the series with me :) it's been fun!
 

do1you9love?

Happy to be here!
Feb 18, 2012
8,822
66,060
Virginia
I finished reading the Maze Runners series and loved it :) it combined my two favorite genres - post-apocalyptic and mystery. The story was good. The characters each had their own developed personalities. The story had a beginning, a middle and an end. (I do NOT like stories that leave the ending up to the reader lol).

Thank you for mentioning the series do1 :) and thank you do1's daughter for discussing the series with me :) it's been fun!
So glad you enjoyed them! She also liked discussing them with you. Now I just have to buckle down and finish so I can find out what y'all were talking about! ;-D
 

Kurben

The Fool on the Hill
Apr 12, 2014
8,993
59,633
54
sweden
I have a serious question for my bookish friends. Here's the situation: I've just finished a book for review. The story is a crime drama along the lines of (WHEN WILL THIS END) Gone Girl. One thing seems to be the situation, then there's a twist that changes the story completely. Whatever. (Can you tell I'm getting very tired of these stories--lol) Anyway, in the last 4--yes 4--pages of the book, the story changes again. Changes genre. A crime drama becomes a supernatural story.

So.

Does this seem right to you? The story is well written otherwise, in fact, some of his wording and pacing reminds me strongly of Mr. King. I think I could accept this twist in a short story, but in a novel it makes me want to do an Annie Wilkes ("It's a cockadoodie cheat!"). I owe a review on it soon, and I'm stumped as to what I'm going to say.

What say you? Fair or not fair story development?
I think you should point it out. Both the Gone Girl - itis sickness and the twist problem and the genre change. You should obviously also point out that it is wellwritten and other good points. Perhaps along the lines of What Does this book want to be? And no it doesnot seem right to me. It is a technique sometimes used in short stories and there you can swallow it but for a novel? No. And it needs to be said. Reviews often irritates me because so many seem like propaganda for the book. Other authors writing reviews along the lines of very promising, a book you need to read and so on. Sometimesyou even wonder if they have read the book. A review is for the readers (IMO), not to calm the sensitive ego of a writer. If there is a problem with a book the reviewer should mention it/them. Just my opinion.
 

morgan

Well-Known Member
Jul 11, 2010
29,088
102,583
North Dakota
After I finished The Girl with All the Gifts, I read somewhere there was going to be a sequel/prequel, but didn't know it's already been published! I reserved The Boy on the Bridge at the library today. Think I'm next in line - might be almost a month before I get my hands on it, but I'm very excited. I was told it starts out as a prequel to TGWATG, but the ending is a sequel. Sounds interesting!
 

Dana Jean

Moderator
Moderator
Apr 11, 2006
49,067
209,983
Thornfield
After I finished The Girl with All the Gifts, I read somewhere there was going to be a sequel/prequel, but didn't know it's already been published! I reserved The Boy on the Bridge at the library today. Think I'm next in line - might be almost a month before I get my hands on it, but I'm very excited. I was told it starts out as a prequel to TGWATG, but the ending is a sequel. Sounds interesting!
Arrrgggh! I didn't know there was a sequel/prequel!
 
The Institute - Coming September 10th, 2019