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Ash Housewares

New Member
Nov 7, 2017
2
9
75
So, I'm just about finished book 4 of the Tower series and am still trying to fathom the character accents. As I read I keep changing in my mind from a western accent to a Scottish accent to an Irish accent to a British accent. Does anyone have any idea which choice I should go for as I read? Or, is the dialogue a mixture of all four? Or, is it a perverted version of the Old West, only? Incidentally, read the first three when they originally came out, and, then, finding a hole in my heart, after mr. King's accident, I have been patiently waiting for the last three. Having retired in January from a long career of middle-class servitude, I find that rereading the first three, the story is completely different in my mind thinking back to when I read the originals when they first came out. Fascinating, what old age does to you.
 

Ash Housewares

New Member
Nov 7, 2017
2
9
75
Pardon my confusion, but, the "look/appearance" of the characters, for me, has always come immediately, subject to additional description which the author may add as the story unfolds. In these books, I find that the assignation of accents is subject to the words themselves. i.e. "yar" taken from many nautical tales, an old British exclamation in my experience, and, some of the other abbreviated terms tend to lend themselves to an Irish accent. Dependent upon the "community" I may be visiting in these books, I tend to "think" the dialogue, alternating between British, Irish, and, "American" accents. Kind of a dilemma, but, worth the effort as it always adds to the flavor of the the tale if I reread a passage and apply a different accent. But, beg pardon, and, thankee-sai, I appreciate the input(s).
 

not_nadine

Comfortably Roont
Nov 19, 2011
29,655
139,785
Behind you
Pardon my confusion, but, the "look/appearance" of the characters, for me, has always come immediately, subject to additional description which the author may add as the story unfolds. In these books, I find that the assignation of accents is subject to the words themselves. i.e. "yar" taken from many nautical tales, an old British exclamation in my experience, and, some of the other abbreviated terms tend to lend themselves to an Irish accent. Dependent upon the "community" I may be visiting in these books, I tend to "think" the dialogue, alternating between British, Irish, and, "American" accents. Kind of a dilemma, but, worth the effort as it always adds to the flavor of the the tale if I reread a passage and apply a different accent. But, beg pardon, and, thankee-sai, I appreciate the input(s).
You say true. Welcome to the board.