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Any clue why this one is so hard to come by?

Discussion in 'The Colorado Kid' started by Takoren, Nov 30, 2015.

  1. Takoren

    Takoren Well-Known Member

    I got back into reading King recently after years of not reading him, so I never bought a copy of The Colorado Kid. When I started to collect his works again so that I could read or re-read everything, I figured I'd find this one in a book store the same way I see Joyland everywhere (and have now bought a copy). But not a single book store in my immediate area carries it. Not even the second hand ones. The second hand ones have marked it as "rare" and I can't even order it online through my local chain.

    Amazon wants, minimally, $35 for it, a thin book that retails for eight bucks. What on earth is going on with that?
     
  2. summer_sky

    summer_sky Well-Known Member

    Maybe, a mad rush for the book form after a tv series drew a new audience?
     
  3. Moderator

    Moderator Ms. Mod Administrator

    It was a relatively small print run to begin with and there aren't any plans for another printing so it makes it harder to come by.
     
  4. do1you9love?

    do1you9love? Happy to be here!

    If you don't mind a gently used copy, I'd recommend alibris.com or half.com. They have copies for sale for much lesss.
     
  5. Takoren

    Takoren Well-Known Member

    Thanks, do1you9love, that works great. Ms. Mod, I had no idea there was only one limited print run. That being the case, it's no surprise at all.

    My wife was actually going to pay Amazon's price to get me one for Christmas. Alibris will make her happy.
     
  6. kingricefan

    kingricefan All-being, keeper of Space, Time & Dimension.

    I just checked on thriftbooks.com and they want over $15 for it! That's crazy! I'd keep checking at the used bookstores or thrift stores in your area. You're bound to run across one at some point.
     
  7. summer_sky

    summer_sky Well-Known Member

    What sort of considerations go into deciding how many copies of any given book will be run at first printing?
     
  8. Moderator

    Moderator Ms. Mod Administrator

    I'd just be guessing as that's not part of my job description :smile: but I'd think past sales would be a factor along with production costs and the demographic the publisher thinks the book would appeal to as well as their own abilities to market the book. carrie's younger brother might have more insight into what determines print run numbers as someone who used to work at Penguin and on that side of the business.
     
  9. GNTLGNT

    GNTLGNT The idiot is IN

    ..."guessing" isn't part of your job???....how about "hindsight"?.....:biggrin2:
     
  10. GNTLGNT

    GNTLGNT The idiot is IN

    ...there's a ton of listings on Ebay right now....prices from cheap to stupid....
     
  11. Takoren

    Takoren Well-Known Member

    I had thought about ebay but I can't ever seem to bid right.
     
  12. GNTLGNT

    GNTLGNT The idiot is IN

    ...there are a few "Buy It Now"'s, that are quite reasonable...go for it....
     
  13. morgan

    morgan Well-Known Member

    So, there was only one printing of Colorado Kid? Is the book smaller in size than the first printing (large paperback) of Joyland?
     
  14. kingricefan

    kingricefan All-being, keeper of Space, Time & Dimension.

    Colorado Kid is the same size of an original small paperback. There was no trade paperback (larger, almost the size of a hardback) nor was it printed in the newer slightly larger paperback size.
     
  15. morgan

    morgan Well-Known Member

    Thank you! :)
     
  16. morgan

    morgan Well-Known Member

    And only one printing?
     
  17. kingricefan

    kingricefan All-being, keeper of Space, Time & Dimension.

    As far as I know. Maybe John Hanic could answer that one for sure, or maybe Bev Vincent? I don't believe it had a lot of publicity when it was published. At that time Hard Case Crime was probably considered a 'small' publisher. They were publishing crime noir novels, some new, some older titles. King liked the idea of going with them for this title as HCC harkened back to the days when he (King) walked around with a paperback in his back pocket. So, without a lot of fanfare I don't think it sold a lot of copies. I do remember a few members saying that they couldn't even find it at their bookstores as HCC books weren't being sold by them back then. I think HCC is now considered a bigger publisher (certainly not as big as Viking, Doubleday, Putnam, etc.) but they've got a lot of great titles in their catalogue now by some 'name' authors. They've published all of the 'lost' adventure novels by Michael Crichton that he wrote under the 'John Lange' non-de-plume and they signed that contract with Michael before he passed away. Michael even added some new passages to a couple of them.
     
  18. morgan

    morgan Well-Known Member

    Thank you once again!
    I enjoy Crichton's work (State of Fear is my favorite) and will have to look into the John Lange books. So terribly sad that he passed away. :(
     
  19. Mr. Cranky

    Mr. Cranky Well-Known Member

  20. carrie's younger brother

    carrie's younger brother Well-Known Member

    It was actually Simon & Schuster (and then later Time Warner), not Penguin. But that's neither here nor there (I love that phrase!). ;-D

    Ms. Mod is pretty much spot on with her very educated guess. I worked in marketing/advertising so I was not privy to exactly what went into their calculations for a print run, but all the factors Ms. Mod mentioned are definitely taken into account.

    Like working in any field, working in publishing was a big eye opener for me as to the amount of time and money that goes into the publication, marketing and publicity for one little book. Looking at it from the reader's side of the book (so to speak) we often think of it with rose colored glasses on, but in the end, it really is just like any business beholden to its share holders: the bottom line is $$$. But that's not to say the art, creativity and intelligence factors are not also valued, because they most certainly are. My years in publishing are the most favorite years of my career.
     

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