British vs American Grammar

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Moderator

Ms. Mod
Administrator
Jul 10, 2006
52,243
157,324
Maine
Welcome to the Board!

Stephen doesn't personally respond to questions asked here on the Message Board so I'm sorry to say you won't be getting his explanation. My best guess, though, is that he means that American grammar rules change so what may have been true at one time no longer is. An example of this from my own education is that when I was younger, commas were much more in use than they are today. If I was reading writing tips from that time, I wouldn't be "correctly" using current practice.
 

DiO'Bolic

Not completely obtuse
Nov 14, 2013
22,864
129,998
Poconos, PA
Welcome to the Board!

Stephen doesn't personally respond to questions asked here on the Message Board so I'm sorry to say you won't be getting his explanation. My best guess, though, is that he means that American grammar rules change so what may have been true at one time no longer is. An example of this from my own education is that when I was younger, commas were much more in use than they are today. If I was reading writing tips from that time, I wouldn't be "correctly" using current practice.
Hmmm... Learn something new every day. I thought all you had to so to make a word British was to throw an extra "u" in it. :)
 

GNTLGNT

The idiot is IN
Jun 15, 2007
87,651
358,754
58
Cambridge, Ohio
Hello,

In your book it says 'American grammar doesn't have the sturdiness of British grammar' - what does this mean and why?

Thank you
Juliet
....Hi Juliet....my opinion would be that British grammar has withstood the vagaries of change....meaning it is classic and not all garbled up and twisted about like American wording, what with slang, double meanings, etc......