chemical dependency and writing

  • New to the board or trying to figure out how something works here? Check out the User Guide.
  • New 2019 Hours: The message board is closed between the hours of 4pm ET Thursday and 8:30am ET Tuesday.

    As always, the Board will be open to read and those who have those privileges can still send private messages and post to Profiles.

carlcreighton

New Member
May 30, 2019
3
17
35
This is a sensitive topic but this feels like a safe place right? Wait, wait. First off, thank you Stephen King! You are my hero! I've only read 3/4 of two of your books, On Writing being one of them. I'm a slow reader too and I've been saving your books for now I guess. My mission and I choose to accept it is to finish writing my novel in the next three months like I haven't been working on it for three years and read your books.

Chemical dependency and writing! I'm reading The Shining (the other book I'm 3/4 through) and the way you handle Jack's alcoholism really resonates with me. And then hearing your own story in On Writing... Thank you so much for being! I used to have a drinking problem, though I didn't know it at the time. I probably still do but I'm not drinking just to be safe. That and weed have felt like must haves when I try to create something and now that I'm not doing either thing, I feel a lot more on top of what I'm making instead of it being on top of me. And what you said about art being for the benefit of life and not the other way around. Perspective! Anyway, it means a lot and I wanted to say thank you and maybe open a discussion with others who have had chemical dependency writing issues and you know connect.
 

mal

content
Jun 23, 2007
4,137
23,172
56
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Personal addictions aside I wonder if state dependency would come into play. For example, you write something when you're drunk. I read it when I'm sober and think "meh". I read it when I'm drunk and think "Holy crap is this ever good!". I think we should experiment with different conditions (i.e., different drugs) and provide our feedback (just kidding on that last sentence).
 

Blake

Well-Known Member
Feb 18, 2013
4,132
17,219
This is a sensitive topic but this feels like a safe place right? Wait, wait. First off, thank you Stephen King! You are my hero! I've only read 3/4 of two of your books, On Writing being one of them. I'm a slow reader too and I've been saving your books for now I guess. My mission and I choose to accept it is to finish writing my novel in the next three months like I haven't been working on it for three years and read your books.

Chemical dependency and writing! I'm reading The Shining (the other book I'm 3/4 through) and the way you handle Jack's alcoholism really resonates with me. And then hearing your own story in On Writing... Thank you so much for being! I used to have a drinking problem, though I didn't know it at the time. I probably still do but I'm not drinking just to be safe. That and weed have felt like must haves when I try to create something and now that I'm not doing either thing, I feel a lot more on top of what I'm making instead of it being on top of me. And what you said about art being for the benefit of life and not the other way around. Perspective! Anyway, it means a lot and I wanted to say thank you and maybe open a discussion with others who have had chemical dependency writing issues and you know connect.
My father's name was Carl. You can tell King was drinking more when you read say, Cujo, compared with Pet Sematary, because Cujo seems more disjointed when you read it. I recently typed in a thing is the search engine, CC Search, about King, and I got a picture I've never seen before of King and what's looks like a picture taken by a fan. He's sitting down, and a lady is standing beside him, and there looks like a bottle of beer on the table in front of him. Strange how times change. These days people are scared about their public image, media advisors and PR people telling them stuff.
 
  • Like
Reactions: GNTLGNT and Notaro

Deviancy

I go Boo.....
Mar 20, 2019
157
499
46
California
www.facebook.com
That and weed have felt like must haves when I try to create something and now that I'm not doing either thing, I feel a lot more on top of what I'm making instead of it being on top of me.
Coffee and smokes stimulate me when it comes to writing and tech work but they have their downsides of course. However, nicotine has been proven to make one less prone to alzheimers and basic forgetfulness, its only positive side. The funny thing is, some of the biggest rock albums of all time, they were made while the musicians were totally high. There are exceptions but very few. Does that mean it takes drugs to make great rock albums? I don't think so since U2 is pretty clean and they released a few iconic albums but there are bands like GNR that just lost it after going clean. As for writers, some famous writers were big time drinkers but I think the drinking just mellowed them out so they could write, don't think it made them better writers.
 
  • Like
Reactions: GNTLGNT and Notaro

Blake

Well-Known Member
Feb 18, 2013
4,132
17,219
Coffee and smokes stimulate me when it comes to writing and tech work but they have their downsides of course. However, nicotine has been proven to make one less prone to alzheimers and basic forgetfulness, its only positive side. The funny thing is, some of the biggest rock albums of all time, they were made while the musicians were totally high. There are exceptions but very few. Does that mean it takes drugs to make great rock albums? I don't think so since U2 is pretty clean and they released a few iconic albums but there are bands like GNR that just lost it after going clean. As for writers, some famous writers were big time drinkers but I think the drinking just mellowed them out so they could write, don't think it made them better writers.
I don't know if dependency on alcohol is physical or psychological. It is physical once the first thing a person does when they wake up is have a drink. I think that most people that drink are fundamentally lonely people and drinking is a way of hiding/escaping something. They can't stand their own company. I think drinking can be occupationally related: like the RocknRoll scene; myself, I noticed I started to drink much more when I started school-teaching as an outlet from the stress of the day. I think some people are born with a 'alcoholic gene'. But in the long run, I don't think it helps creativity, I think it destroys creativity because it can sap a person's motivation. Back in the day, here and in Sydney, there was a pub on nearly every corner of a street.
 

Deviancy

I go Boo.....
Mar 20, 2019
157
499
46
California
www.facebook.com
But in the long run, I don't think it helps creativity, I think it destroys creativity because it can sap a person's motivation. Back in the day, here and in Sydney, there was a pub on nearly every corner of a street.
I think drinking has a negative impact on creativity as well. I should have been clear, I think its drugs that cause a hallucination effect that may excel creativity but only briefly, I think abusing those drugs can actually lead to less creativity because the dependency gets stronger and stronger. Morrison when he was just starting saw things in his trips and then he wrote about them but as he got more and more dependent, the writing got weaker and eventually he died. Down side to everything though.
 

Blake

Well-Known Member
Feb 18, 2013
4,132
17,219
Coffee and smokes stimulate me when it comes to writing and tech work but they have their downsides of course. However, nicotine has been proven to make one less prone to alzheimers and basic forgetfulness, its only positive side. The funny thing is, some of the biggest rock albums of all time, they were made while the musicians were totally high. There are exceptions but very few. Does that mean it takes drugs to make great rock albums? I don't think so since U2 is pretty clean and they released a few iconic albums but there are bands like GNR that just lost it after going clean. As for writers, some famous writers were big time drinkers but I think the drinking just mellowed them out so they could write, don't think it made them better writers.
Yes. I have a picture of my father drinking with Robert Mitchum.
 

Dana Jean

Moderator
Moderator
Apr 11, 2006
49,372
211,710
Thornfield
I don't know if dependency on alcohol is physical or psychological. It is physical once the first thing a person does when they wake up is have a drink. I think that most people that drink are fundamentally lonely people and drinking is a way of hiding/escaping something. They can't stand their own company. I think drinking can be occupationally related: like the RocknRoll scene; myself, I noticed I started to drink much more when I started school-teaching as an outlet from the stress of the day. I think some people are born with a 'alcoholic gene'. But in the long run, I don't think it helps creativity, I think it destroys creativity because it can sap a person's motivation. Back in the day, here and in Sydney, there was a pub on nearly every corner of a street.
What were the ages of your pupils when you were teaching? What subject did you teach? Did you enjoy it?
 

Brash.Kid

Member
Mar 11, 2019
17
90
26
lecicom.godaddysites.com
This is a sensitive topic but this feels like a safe place right? Wait, wait. First off, thank you Stephen King! You are my hero! I've only read 3/4 of two of your books, On Writing being one of them. I'm a slow reader too and I've been saving your books for now I guess. My mission and I choose to accept it is to finish writing my novel in the next three months like I haven't been working on it for three years and read your books.

Chemical dependency and writing! I'm reading The Shining (the other book I'm 3/4 through) and the way you handle Jack's alcoholism really resonates with me. And then hearing your own story in On Writing... Thank you so much for being! I used to have a drinking problem, though I didn't know it at the time. I probably still do but I'm not drinking just to be safe. That and weed have felt like must haves when I try to create something and now that I'm not doing either thing, I feel a lot more on top of what I'm making instead of it being on top of me. And what you said about art being for the benefit of life and not the other way around. Perspective! Anyway, it means a lot and I wanted to say thank you and maybe open a discussion with others who have had chemical dependency writing issues and you know connect.
I may not have had chemical dependency but I would say what hindered most of my creativity was depression. I believe depression and chemical dependency go hand and hand. Though where some use substances to generate thought- deep depression does the complete opposite. Honestly I was even depressed with being unable to find time to write and be creative. I wish you well and continued happiness- may you be able to find the right inspiration for your projects. Stay Blessed
 

Blake

Well-Known Member
Feb 18, 2013
4,132
17,219
What were the ages of your pupils when you were teaching? What subject did you teach? Did you enjoy it?
High School, ages from Year 7 (12, 13 year old students) to Year 12 ( 17 or 18 year olds). I'm qualified to teach History and Geography, but have taught other subjects. For instance, and related to SKMB, back in 2003, I filled in for a female English teacher who was going on maternity leave at the end of the year. I had her Year 7, 8, and 9, 10 and 11 English classes. She left me work but said she didn't mind if I chose something else (she left a sought of Young Adult book to be read in class etc) so I didn't like said book, I found it boring, so I looked in the English Department's storeroom and came across a crate of The Running Man (the edition with Schwarzenegger on the cover, the tie-in for the movie edition. That's the only time I ever seen a King book in a school storeroom (but as I said I don't normally teach English). I don't know if any Stephen King's stuff has been taught as part of the NSW Department of Education curriculum.
 
Last edited:

Dana Jean

Moderator
Moderator
Apr 11, 2006
49,372
211,710
Thornfield
High School, ages from Year 7 (12, 13 year old students) to Year 12 ( 17 or 18 year olds). I'm qualified to teach History and Geography, but have taught other subjects. For instance, and related to SKMB, back in 2003, I filled in for a female English teacher who was going on maternity leave at the end of the year. I had her Year 7, 8, and 9, 10 and 11 English classes. She left me work but said she didn't mind if I chose something else (she left a sought of Young Adult book to be read in class etc) so I didn't like said book, I found it boring, so I looked in the English Department's storeroom and came across a crate of The Running Man (the edition with Schwarzenegger on the cover, the tie-in for the movie edition. That's the only time I ever seen a King book in a school storeroom (but as I said I don't normally teach English). I don't know if any Stephen King's stuff has been taught as part of the NSW Department of Education curriculum.
Very cool. Did you enjoy teaching?
 
  • Like
Reactions: GNTLGNT
The Institute - Coming September 10th, 2019