CUJO

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fljoe0

Cantre Member
Apr 5, 2008
13,800
56,025
57
120 miles S of the Pancake/Waffle line
#8
Movie and book - different endings. So wrong!
According to his interview on the blu-ray edition, SK was ok with the ending. He even had some input with the screen writer. This blurb is from IMDB

Stephen King said that if he could go back and change anything from one of his books it would be letting Tad live. This is why he survives in this film.

He seems ok with some of the changes that screen writers make (not all of them but some of them).
 
Likes: GNTLGNT
Feb 3, 2015
6,929
20,501
Old Dominion
#9
According to his interview on the blu-ray edition, SK was ok with the ending. He even had some input with the screen writer. This blurb is from IMDB

Stephen King said that if he could go back and change anything from one of his books it would be letting Tad live. This is why he survives in this film.

He seems ok with some of the changes that screen writers make (not all of them but some of them).
Thanks for sharing! I'm just such a stickler and purist when it comes to this....
 

not_nadine

Comfortably Roont
Nov 19, 2011
29,376
137,432
Behind you
#13
Cujo movie dog fun facts.

Cujo | Dog Actors

The article states that there is not a reason that a St Bernard was used, but this is from the SK Library

Cujo

Inspiration:

In the spring of 1977 Stephen took his motorcycle to a mechanic who lived outside of Bridgton, Maine, "in the middle of nowhere". "I took the bike out there, and I just barely made it. And this huge Saint Bernard came out of the barn, growling. Then this guy came out and, I mean, he was Joe Camber-he looked almost like one of those guys out of Deliverance. And I was retreating, and wishing that I was not on my motorcycle, when the guy said, 'Don't worry. He don't bite.' And so I reached out to pet him, and the dog started to go for me. And the guy walked over and said, 'Down Gonzo,' or whatever the dog's name was and gave him this huge whack on the rump, and the dog yelped and sat down. The guy said, 'Gonzo never done that before. I guess he don't like your face.' And that became the central situation of the book, mixed with those old "Movies of the Week," the made-for-television movies that they used to have on ABC. I thought to myself, what if you could have a situation that was an extension of one scene. It would be the ultimate TV movie. There would be one set, there would be one room. You'd never even have to change the camera angle. So there was one very small place, and it became Donna's Pinto--and everything just flowed from that situation--the big dog and the Pinto."
 
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