DT References in Books Published After the DT VII?

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Neesy

#1 fan (Annie Wilkes cousin) 1st cousin Mom's side
May 24, 2012
57,382
212,473
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
#43
Of course all of Stephen King's books are connected to the Dark Tower. What the Dark Tower IS is a metaphor for life, specifically the life of Stephen King. Just like life, the Tower and all the worlds sprang forth without explanation from the magic of the prim. Originally, the tower was supported by magic, but eventually as the magic faded, it was propped up by reason and science. In childhood, everything is magic and the world is full of wonder. As we grow this worldview is replaced by a reasoned replacement. Science and knowledge replaces faith and superstition. The beams are created. Roland clearly represents the stoic, persistence of faith in things working out as they should. The Crimson King clearly represents the mad, self-destructive side of King's personality. The breakers represent many things that are trying to bring the tower down; substance abuse, age, sickness, injury, etc.....There is no illusion in the story that the Tower is not teetering and eventually it will fall, as each of us must eventually come to the clearing at the end of the path. However, the journey of the Ka-Tet represents the quest to find God, to have answers, to achieve a degree of immortality. And by capturing the tale in the symbolic, intriguing, and exciting way that Stephen King has, he has preserved this view of the multiverse for his constant readers, thus achieving a sort of quasi immortality. Or maybe I'm wrong.....what do you think?
I'd say that is a very good answer :yes_pig:
 

recitador

Speed Reader
Sep 3, 2016
1,704
7,947
35
#46
I've mentioned this in another post but I was wondering if 11/22/63 takes place on another level of the Tower. Richie and Bev say they believe "the guy in a clown suit" won't be coming back but in IT Bill starts forgetting on his bike ride home...thoughts?
they forgot over time. they may have forgotten most of the specifics of what went on under the sewer, but they would have remembered the salient points, the killer, the fact that they did *something* about it . . .even ben admits to remembering, if only a little bit, when he was in high school and had moved far away. the memories faded faster when they were adults because it was truly over
 

taylor29

Well-Known Member
Mar 18, 2014
103
382
#47
Of course all of Stephen King's books are connected to the Dark Tower. What the Dark Tower IS is a metaphor for life, specifically the life of Stephen King. Just like life, the Tower and all the worlds sprang forth without explanation from the magic of the prim. Originally, the tower was supported by magic, but eventually as the magic faded, it was propped up by reason and science. In childhood, everything is magic and the world is full of wonder. As we grow this worldview is replaced by a reasoned replacement. Science and knowledge replaces faith and superstition. The beams are created. Roland clearly represents the stoic, persistence of faith in things working out as they should. The Crimson King clearly represents the mad, self-destructive side of King's personality. The breakers represent many things that are trying to bring the tower down; substance abuse, age, sickness, injury, etc.....There is no illusion in the story that the Tower is not teetering and eventually it will fall, as each of us must eventually come to the clearing at the end of the path. However, the journey of the Ka-Tet represents the quest to find God, to have answers, to achieve a degree of immortality. And by capturing the tale in the symbolic, intriguing, and exciting way that Stephen King has, he has preserved this view of the multiverse for his constant readers, thus achieving a sort of quasi immortality. Or maybe I'm wrong.....what do you think?
I am decidedly late to this reply...but of course, you're right. We are all epic. Our journeys are epic, and I have little doubt that this journey we've gone on in the DT series resonates because we all recognize ourselves in the story. This all is about meaning. All of it.

I love all of your musings. ✌

But also remember there's a lot of joy in discovery...meaning that we can say they're all connected and agree but I like connecting the dots.

I must have meaning AND conspiracy theories on my level of the tower. ❤️
 

dedMasque

Active Member
Jan 19, 2018
29
88
32
Kentucky
#49
Blue car syndrome, perhaps, but it's worth pointing out King does indulge himself in his novels from time to time. He references DT in so many of his books that it's not out of the realm of possibility that he is making DT references in The Shining.
Near the beginning of the film "The Shining", Danny Torrance has his first outward conversation with Tony, "He's the little boy that lives inside of my mouth." He then passes out and Wendy calls a child therapist to come over and evaluate Danny. The Therapist tells Wendy that if the problem persists they can always take him to their facility and run tests. It's my belief that this Therapist serves The Man in Black and helps gather children from Keystone Earth who show signs of having special gifts like The Shine just like the "Skinless Faced Men" who tried to kidnap Jake Chambers under the same premise in New York in The Dark Tower. On another note these two characters show how different The Shine can manifest itself in children. Jake dreams visions in his sleep while Danny goes into a trance and is told stuff by Tony who seems to be an imaginary friend but is probably most likely a ghost that's latched on to him.
 
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