Full HD or 4K, which do you prefer for movies?

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Which do you like better for movies, Full HD or 4K?

  • Full HD

    Votes: 1 25.0%
  • 4K

    Votes: 3 75.0%

  • Total voters
    4

Gerald

Well-Known Member
Sep 8, 2011
1,844
5,841
The Netherlands
Also, pictures and movies on my pc looked very dark suddenly, dark pictures were almost unwatchable. So under personal preferences/calibrating colours I put the gamma a lot higher. But now images in general don't look so great, but at least are visible enough, and movies on Youtube and things like that are either in a super high quality, or very low. Of course some Youtube content is very low in quality, but I'm not sure why in general images should look worse.

Letters have improved greatly in general. This forum is much more readable, with very sharp, dark letters.
 

fushingfeef

Finally Uber!
Aug 14, 2009
10,047
20,674
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
I've heard people say that unless your TV screen is 75 inches or more, there's not a noticeable difference between full HD (1080p) and 4k. I have a 100" projector screen and I still put off getting 4k until very recently, and I'm very happy with it. The difference is most dramatic in the dynamic range, the black colors are so much more truly black, and the light and colors are much more vibrant and realistic. The higher resolution gives you much more depth, particularly in long shots such as crowd scenes and long distance views.

Still, I'm in no rush to upgrade all of my Blu-rays and DVD's except for a few favorite titles.
 

Gerald

Well-Known Member
Sep 8, 2011
1,844
5,841
The Netherlands
I've heard people say that unless your TV screen is 75 inches or more, there's not a noticeable difference between full HD (1080p) and 4k. I have a 100" projector screen and I still put off getting 4k until very recently, and I'm very happy with it. The difference is most dramatic in the dynamic range, the black colors are so much more truly black, and the light and colors are much more vibrant and realistic. The higher resolution gives you much more depth, particularly in long shots such as crowd scenes and long distance views.

Still, I'm in no rush to upgrade all of my Blu-rays and DVD's except for a few favorite titles.
I have no 4K content to check if there is any difference. I'm sure there is some. In any case the 4K screen doesn't make the filmgrain worse, it's about the same.

There is a difference though in the image as a whole. I used to have an LCD tv and now I have LED. This makes a huge difference to me. It does something strange with your image as a whole. It's difficult to describe. It especially bothers me with movies and tv-series. Everything gets a very strange look. I've tried to adjust all the settings, but I can't get it away, so I think it's the nature of the technology of LED itself. I don't think I can get used to it, I can't imagine having to look at movies and series for years like this. So I will return the tv most likely. But it might be hard to find a new LCD tv, because I don't think they make those anymore.
 

Gerald

Well-Known Member
Sep 8, 2011
1,844
5,841
The Netherlands
I'll try to describe what bothers me. Maybe someone knows what I'm talking about.

It probably has to do with the difference in technology. It's as if there is a 'flat look' to everything. There used to be a big difference whether you watched, say, a small scale tv-series shot on cheap video, or a you watched a big Hollywood film. Now everything looks like that small scale tv-series shot on cheap video, whether it actually is a small scale tv-series or a big film.
That's the only way I can describe it. It makes everything sort of 'cheap looking', but it's hard to say exactly what factors in the image cause that.
 

Gerald

Well-Known Member
Sep 8, 2011
1,844
5,841
The Netherlands
I'll try to describe what bothers me. Maybe someone knows what I'm talking about.

It probably has to do with the difference in technology. It's as if there is a 'flat look' to everything. There used to be a big difference whether you watched, say, a small scale tv-series shot on cheap video, or a you watched a big Hollywood film. Now everything looks like that small scale tv-series shot on cheap video, whether it actually is a small scale tv-series or a big film.
That's the only way I can describe it. It makes everything sort of 'cheap looking', but it's hard to say exactly what factors in the image cause that.
It seems the cause is the resolution. I put the resolution of my Playstation to 2160p and then I get normal image again. You can be ages on the phone with customer services at high phone costs and they just don't tell you these things. I found out by accident. I had it set to 'automatic', but you have to set it to 2160p only apparently. So my blu-rays look normal again now.

But the problem now is still with the image of the tv receiver. My tv-receiver won't give higher than 1080p, and that makes the image look bad. But it seems there are no settings for input on the tv itself, where you can set it to 1080p for input.
 
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