On Writing - Tried the exercise

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julesD

New Member
Dec 27, 2018
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Hello! I thoroughly enjoyed the book On Writing. I loved the suggestions to write simply and write truthfully. It was affirming and helpful. I'm so grateful to have been given a glimpse of Stephen King's genius at work.

I tried the exercise in the book and wanted to share my experience.

My background is in playwriting so I found that my story was comprised of about 90% dialogue.

When I first read the scenario, I was downstairs in the basement late at night and the 3-foot tall, light-up Santa that moves back and forth was right in my eye line. As I got more and more creeped out by the idea of someone in my house, I got more and more creeped out by the Santa. I was trying to let these characters live in my mind and see what they would do and say, but I couldn't do it at that moment. I had to return to it later that week.

The idea of a man stalking his ex-wife after escaping from prison is truly terrifying and believable, but when it was reversed, as was suggested in the exercise, to the ex-wife being the stalker, it was hard not to make it feel like something from Lifetime Movies. However, I do believe I found a solution and wrote five pages of their encounter.

I really enjoyed this exercise. I think when you have really strong, well-fleshed out characters, you CAN easily watch what they say and do in your mind. It's thrilling and sometimes surprising what they come up with.

Thanks again for an honest book about writing. I got a great deal out of it.
 

Neesy

#1 fan (Annie Wilkes cousin) 1st cousin Mom's side
May 24, 2012
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Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Hello! I thoroughly enjoyed the book On Writing. I loved the suggestions to write simply and write truthfully. It was affirming and helpful. I'm so grateful to have been given a glimpse of Stephen King's genius at work.

I tried the exercise in the book and wanted to share my experience.

My background is in playwriting so I found that my story was comprised of about 90% dialogue.

When I first read the scenario, I was downstairs in the basement late at night and the 3-foot tall, light-up Santa that moves back and forth was right in my eye line. As I got more and more creeped out by the idea of someone in my house, I got more and more creeped out by the Santa. I was trying to let these characters live in my mind and see what they would do and say, but I couldn't do it at that moment. I had to return to it later that week.

The idea of a man stalking his ex-wife after escaping from prison is truly terrifying and believable, but when it was reversed, as was suggested in the exercise, to the ex-wife being the stalker, it was hard not to make it feel like something from Lifetime Movies. However, I do believe I found a solution and wrote five pages of their encounter.

I really enjoyed this exercise. I think when you have really strong, well-fleshed out characters, you CAN easily watch what they say and do in your mind. It's thrilling and sometimes surprising what they come up with.

Thanks again for an honest book about writing. I got a great deal out of it.
Welcome and I'm glad you enjoyed that exercise!
crow welcome with foot raised up.jpg