Stephen King Book to Trade Here or on Trading Site

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CoriSCapnSkip

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Recently I joined PaperbackSwap to list all my extra books which for any reason I am not saving to give as gifts. Here is my bookshelf.

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I am thinking of running better condition paperbacks and desirable hardcovers past the owner of the last lone lorn independent bookstore within driving distance but I don't get there that often so this may actually be more worthwhile. I have also been picking up popular titles in good condition cheap at thrift stores and yard sales to quickly build up credits. Today I found a hardcover in dust jacket of King's The Wind in the Keyhole in like new condition for a quarter. Shall I list it to trade or does anyone here want it? Thanks.
 

GNTLGNT

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CoriSCapnSkip

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I'd love it! What do you need in trade? And what's shipping like from you to me and vice versa?

My long wants list is mostly of books not too common or I'd have them already. I will post a link anyway in case anyone's interested. Also I will accept cash. If sent Media Mail most books going to addresses in the United States are about $3.00. Thanks.

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Neesy

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Recently I joined PaperbackSwap to list all my extra books which for any reason I am not saving to give as gifts. Here is my bookshelf.

PaperBackSwap :: Member Login

I am thinking of running better condition paperbacks and desirable hardcovers past the owner of the last lone lorn independent bookstore within driving distance but I don't get there that often so this may actually be more worthwhile. I have also been picking up popular titles in good condition cheap at thrift stores and yard sales to quickly build up credits. Today I found a hardcover in dust jacket of King's The Wind in the Keyhole in like new condition for a quarter. Shall I list it to trade or does anyone here want it? Thanks.
When I click on your link it just takes me to a generic sign up page. It does not show your bookshelf.

Could you maybe type up a quick list of what you are looking for? - thanks!
 

CoriSCapnSkip

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When I click on your link it just takes me to a generic sign up page. It does not show your bookshelf.

Could you maybe type up a quick list of what you are looking for? - thanks!

Much of it is vintage children's books, many to fill out a series or to give to kids. Also I will of course accept anything Ray Bradbury related, especially if I don't have it or it is a better copy than mine. I can attempt a list as well. I do need nice like new hardcover copies of every gold Newbery medalist from 2013 on.
 

CoriSCapnSkip

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Besides titles listed below, I have some kind of a copy of every gold medalist, in all cases possible a nice hardcover copy, and generally copies of the whole series when the medalist was one of a series. I am noting cases where I know I don't and beyond this list I will just have to check.

The Voyages of Doctor Dolittle by Hugh Lofting, 1923, I have, and several other titles, but not the entire series.

Caddie Woodlawn, by Carol Ryrie Brink, 1936. My hardcover is a very beat-up ex-library with no dust jacket. I also have the sequel, Magical Melons, an older ex-library, again with no dust jacket. Both wonderful and highly recommended for anyone who enjoyed the Little House series.

Roller Skates, by Ruth Sawyer, 1937. Both my copy of this and of its sequel, published both as The Year of Jubilo and Lucinda's Year of Jubilo, are paperbacks.

The High King, by Lloyd Alexander, 1969, is part of a five-book series. I know I have some and not others. Will have to check which.

Julie of the Wolves, by Jean Craighead George, 1973, is part of a series. I have the Newbery winning title in hardcover but other titles are either in paperback or I don't have at all. Again would have to check.

The Grey King, by Susan Cooper, 1976, I have no hardcover copy of the second book in the series (or the first if you count Over Sea, Under Stone as a prequel), The Dark is Rising.

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, by Mildred D. Taylor, 1977, is part of a series. I have maybe one of the other titles in paperback and one in hardcover.

Dicey's Song, by Cynthia Voigt, 1983, is part of a series. I have some of the books but not all.

Sarah, Plain and Tall, by Patricia MacLachlan, 1986, is part of a trilogy. I have no print copies of Skylark or Caleb's Story.

Shiloh, by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor, 1992, is part of a trilogy. I have no print copies of Saving Shiloh or Shiloh Season, and my copy of Shiloh leaves something to be desired. It is a hardcover but not library binding, one of those Weekly Reader types with the art printed on the cover, no dust jacket.

The Giver, by Lois Lowry, 1994, is part of a series. I have none of the other titles.

A Year Down Yonder, by Richard Peck, 2001, is part of a series. Don't think I have a print copy of A Season of Gifts but would have to check.

Crispin: The Cross of Lead, by Avi, 2003, has at least one sequel of which I don't have a print copy. Possibly is or will be a series.

(You didn't hear it from me, but right here is where the gold medalist books stopped being good with some exception for The Higher Power of Lucky.)

Kira-Kira by Cynthia Kadohata, 2005, my copy is hardcover, but not much better than my copy of Shiloh. I actually saw a better copy at a thrift store, but they wanted three bucks for it and Kira-Kira is not worth three bucks.

Criss Cross, by Lynne Rae Perkins, 2006, is one of at least two books, possibly more. I don't have any of the others and thought I was going to die reading this one, but as a completist I guess I should collect the others, but don't promise to read them. Nothing is particularly wrong with the book except that parts are mildly interesting and other parts are horrendously boring. Very true to life but a bit too much so.

Beyond the above titles I would have to check what I need. All but the last twenty years or so are mostly ex-library and the last twenty years or so are mostly not.

2013: The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate (HarperCollins Children's Books)
2014: Flora & Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures by Kate DiCamillo (Candlewick Press)
2015: The Crossover by Kwame Alexander (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
2016: Last Stop on Market Street by Matt de la Peña (G.P. Putnam's Sons/Penguin)
2017: The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill (Algonquin Young Readers/Workman)
2018: Hello, Universe by Erin Entrada Kelly (Greenwillow Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers)

I haven't read the 2008-2018 winners, but pretty much have to as forty years ago I made a vow to read every gold medalist and since the award began in 1922 and I've already read this many books I have to read the remainder even if it kills me. Sometime between 1984 and 1988 I caught up and threw a party with cakes decorated to represent each title. In 1998 I caught up completely and had my photograph taken with all the books up to that point. I came across the picture the other day. I should really do an update I guess, but barring miracles it will not happen in 2018.
 

Dana Jean

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Besides titles listed below, I have some kind of a copy of every gold medalist, in all cases possible a nice hardcover copy, and generally copies of the whole series when the medalist was one of a series. I am noting cases where I know I don't and beyond this list I will just have to check.

The Voyages of Doctor Dolittle by Hugh Lofting, 1923, I have, and several other titles, but not the entire series.

Caddie Woodlawn, by Carol Ryrie Brink, 1936. My hardcover is a very beat-up ex-library with no dust jacket. I also have the sequel, Magical Melons, an older ex-library, again with no dust jacket. Both wonderful and highly recommended for anyone who enjoyed the Little House series.

Roller Skates, by Ruth Sawyer, 1937. Both my copy of this and of its sequel, published both as The Year of Jubilo and Lucinda's Year of Jubilo, are paperbacks.

The High King, by Lloyd Alexander, 1969, is part of a five-book series. I know I have some and not others. Will have to check which.

Julie of the Wolves, by Jean Craighead George, 1973, is part of a series. I have the Newbery winning title in hardcover but other titles are either in paperback or I don't have at all. Again would have to check.

The Grey King, by Susan Cooper, 1976, I have no hardcover copy of the second book in the series (or the first if you count Over Sea, Under Stone as a prequel), The Dark is Rising.

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, by Mildred D. Taylor, 1977, is part of a series. I have maybe one of the other titles in paperback and one in hardcover.

Dicey's Song, by Cynthia Voigt, 1983, is part of a series. I have some of the books but not all.

Sarah, Plain and Tall, by Patricia MacLachlan, 1986, is part of a trilogy. I have no print copies of Skylark or Caleb's Story.

Shiloh, by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor, 1992, is part of a trilogy. I have no print copies of Saving Shiloh or Shiloh Season, and my copy of Shiloh leaves something to be desired. It is a hardcover but not library binding, one of those Weekly Reader types with the art printed on the cover, no dust jacket.

The Giver, by Lois Lowry, 1994, is part of a series. I have none of the other titles.

A Year Down Yonder, by Richard Peck, 2001, is part of a series. Don't think I have a print copy of A Season of Gifts but would have to check.

Crispin: The Cross of Lead, by Avi, 2003, has at least one sequel of which I don't have a print copy. Possibly is or will be a series.

(You didn't hear it from me, but right here is where the gold medalist books stopped being good with some exception for The Higher Power of Lucky.)

Kira-Kira by Cynthia Kadohata, 2005, my copy is hardcover, but not much better than my copy of Shiloh. I actually saw a better copy at a thrift store, but they wanted three bucks for it and Kira-Kira is not worth three bucks.

Criss Cross, by Lynne Rae Perkins, 2006, is one of at least two books, possibly more. I don't have any of the others and thought I was going to die reading this one, but as a completist I guess I should collect the others, but don't promise to read them. Nothing is particularly wrong with the book except that parts are mildly interesting and other parts are horrendously boring. Very true to life but a bit too much so.

Beyond the above titles I would have to check what I need. All but the last twenty years or so are mostly ex-library and the last twenty years or so are mostly not.

2013: The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate (HarperCollins Children's Books)
2014: Flora & Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures by Kate DiCamillo (Candlewick Press)
2015: The Crossover by Kwame Alexander (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
2016: Last Stop on Market Street by Matt de la Peña (G.P. Putnam's Sons/Penguin)
2017: The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill (Algonquin Young Readers/Workman)
2018: Hello, Universe by Erin Entrada Kelly (Greenwillow Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers)

I haven't read the 2008-2018 winners, but pretty much have to as forty years ago I made a vow to read every gold medalist and since the award began in 1922 and I've already read this many books I have to read the remainder even if it kills me. Sometime between 1984 and 1988 I caught up and threw a party with cakes decorated to represent each title. In 1998 I caught up completely and had my photograph taken with all the books up to that point. I came across the picture the other day. I should really do an update I guess, but barring miracles it will not happen in 2018.
This goal you have set for yourself is quite impressive.

Of the ones you have read so far, can you tell me a favorite?
 

CoriSCapnSkip

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On the Paperback Swap site, I updated my request settings to the following, as it is a great big pain when you think you've bought a real book only to discover at home it's a dumbed-down version and I have had this happen with Dr. Dolittle books:

NO Print on Demand titles unless that is the ONLY paper format in which the book is available! If not certain, please ask. If the POD is a nice hardcover and the original book is very rare I might consider it.

For books published in more than one edition, revised editions are all right under some circumstances, such as if the author or publisher changed a few words to make the book more politically correct or timeless, or even if the author rewrote parts is all right. Of course translations are all right in cases where the original work was not in English. ABRIDGED OR ADAPTED VERSIONS ARE NOT ALL RIGHT (except in rare circumstances when buying for illustrations)! If you are unsure how complete and original your copy is, please check!

Thanks.
 

CoriSCapnSkip

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This goal you have set for yourself is quite impressive.

Of the ones you have read so far, can you tell me a favorite?

The book which got me started was reading Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes in 1978. I have even tried to visit locations of some stories, Johnny Tremain among them. For years I avoided the Disney film, afraid it would make a hash of the book, but it is really quite good and I would watch it again.
 

Dana Jean

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The book which got me started was reading Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes in 1978. I have even tried to visit locations of some stories, Johnny Tremain among them. For years I avoided the Disney film, afraid it would make a hash of the book, but it is really quite good and I would watch it again.
I've read that one! And yes, It was good. The silver accident on his hands was well written and I still remember it!
 

CoriSCapnSkip

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Updates: I ordered Roller Skates, Skylark, Shiloh Season, and Saving Shiloh from PaperbackSwap. The newer Newberys are on my wish list there, but my positions are as follows: #26 on The One and Only Ivan, #25 on Flora and Ulysses, #26 on The Crossover, #23 on Last Stop on Market Street, #58 on The Girl Who Drank the Moon, and #19 on Hello, Universe, so with that many people ahead of me not holding my breath.

Correction, the Shiloh series is a quartet, with A Shiloh Christmas, which is now on my wish list.
 

CoriSCapnSkip

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Being just enough of a glutton for punishment, here are the remaining titles not already listed in which one book in the series won the Newbery medal. Partly copy and paste from Wikipedia with some deletions and additions.

Doctor Dolittle Series by Hugh Lofting:
  1. The Story of Doctor Dolittle (1920)
  2. The Voyages of Doctor Dolittle (1922)
  3. Doctor Dolittle's Post Office (1923)
  4. Doctor Dolittle's Circus (1924)
  5. Doctor Dolittle's Zoo (1925)
  6. Doctor Dolittle's Caravan (1926)
  7. Doctor Dolittle's Garden (1927)
  8. Doctor Dolittle in the Moon (1928)
  9. Doctor Dolittle's Return (1933)
  10. Doctor Dolittle's Birthday Book (1936)
  11. Doctor Dolittle and the Secret Lake (copyrighted 1923, but not published until 1948)
  12. Doctor Dolittle and the Green Canary (1950)
  13. Doctor Dolittle's Puddleby Adventures (1952)
(Those I definitely have are The Story of Doctor Dolittle, The Voyages of Doctor Dolittle, Doctor Dolittle's Caravan, and Doctor Dolittle's Puddleby Adventures. I picked up at least one other and got rid of it because it was dumbed-down. All the ones listed in the PaperbackSwap system which I was not sure I have, I put on my Wish List, but didn't add any not in the system.)

The Chronicles of Prydain by Lloyd Alexander:
  1. The Book of Three (1964)
  2. The Black Cauldron (1965) (A 1966 Newbery Honor book and a Disney cartoon. I have the cartoon but have not actually watched it. It's probably good as it caused my young nephew to run screaming from the room several times and then run back.) My favorite of the series.
  3. The Castle of Llyr (1966)
  4. Taran Wanderer (1967) I had the misfortune of reading this during the Iran hostage crisis and when my dad asked me what Taran was I said it was the capital of Iran before I realized what he was asking about.
  5. The High King (1968)
Short Stories

Alexander published eight Prydain short stories, all set before the events of the five novels.

Coll and His White Pig (1965) and The Truthful Harp (1967) are 32-page picture books illustrated by Evaline Ness.

A 1973 collection, The Foundling and Other Tales of Prydain, comprises six new stories of the same length, illustrated by Margot Zemach, and the High King map by Ness. All six stories explore prehistory, "before the birth of Taran Assistant Pig-Keeper", at least fifteen years before the novels.

In 1999, Holt published an expanded edition of The Foundling collecting all eight stories (text only), the High King map, and a new "Prydain Pronunciation Guide" with entries for 49 proper names.

(This is good to know in case I ever become curious enough to check who was right on the pronunciation of Prydain, myself or a nephew who argued with me over it. Please note that Kipling's pronunciation of Mowgli does not cause people to pronounce it correctly.

Of these I know I have The Black Cauldron, The Castle of Llyr, Coll and His White Pig, The Truthful Harp, the 1973 edition of The Foundling and Other Tales of Prydain, and probably The High King.)

Rats of NIMH Series by Robert C. O'Brien and Jane Leslie Conly:

1. Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH (1971) by Robert C. O'Brien
2. Rasco and the Rats of NIMH by Jane Leslie Conly
3. R-T, Margaret, and the Rats of NIMH by Jane Leslie Conly

(I have the first in hardcover and not the other two.)

Julie of the Wolves Series by Jean Craighead George:

1. Julie of the Wolves (1972)
2. Julie (1994)
3. Julie's Wolf Pack (1997)

(I have the first book in hardcover, the second probably in either permabound or paperback, and the third no copy at all.)

Logan Family Saga by Mildred D. Taylor:

1. Song of the Trees (1975)
2. Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry (1976)
3. Let the Circle Be Unbroken (1981) (This appears to be the only book that is not about the Logan family, but Taylor considers it a part of the Logan saga.)
4. The Friendship (1987)
5. Mississippi Bridge (1990)
6. The Road to Memphis (1990)

(I have Song of the Trees in paperback, Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry and Mississippi Bridge in hardcover, and none of the others.)

Tillerman Cycle by Cynthia Voigt:

1. Homecoming (1981)
2. Dicey's Song (1982)
3. A Solitary Blue (1983)
4. The Runner (1985)
5. Come a Stranger (1986)
6. Sons from Afar (1987)
7. Seventeen Against the Dealer (1989)

(I have Homecoming in paperback and possibly in hardcover, Dicey's Song in hardcover, A Solitary Blue, The Runner, and Sons from Afar in hardcover, Come a Stranger in paperback, and don't have Seventeen Against the Dealer at all.)

The Giver Quartet by Lois Lowry:

1. The Giver (1993)
2. Gathering Blue (2000)
3. Messenger (2004)
4. Son (2012)

(I have The Giver in hardcover and none of the others.)

Crispin Series by Avi:

1. Crispin: The Cross of Lead (2002)
2. Crispin: At the Edge of the World (2006)
3. Crispin: The End of Time (2010)

(I have Crispin: The Cross of Lead in hardcover, Crispin: At the Edge of the World as an audiobook, and don't have Crispin: The End of Time at all.)

As far as I can tell, Criss Cross by Lynne Ray Perkins has only one companion book, All Alone in the Universe, which I don't have and will not go out of my way to get. If any of the Newbery winners which I have not read yet have companion books I seriously do not want to know.
 

CoriSCapnSkip

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Okay, couple more: after four or five hours compiling this list, I was still haunted by a horror that some author of a Newbery gold medalist book I did not particularly like had written companion books about every character the main character in the gold medal book had ever met, and I was afraid the book was Criss Cross, but that seems to have only one companion book. I can also rule out the Logan Family Saga and the Tillerman Cycle as I read the first two books in both series and rather liked them.

Perhaps I was purposely blanking on Walk Two Moons, about which I was rather conflicted. A major part of the story is in Lewiston, Idaho, which is close enough for me to be able to drive there. Don't want to give spoilers, so will just say some details I could allow as artistic license while others had me wondering if the main character was time traveling to back before the Lewiston Grade was smoothed out, as the book seemed to be present day although the only real date indication was the fairly recent debate between "Indian" vs. "Native American," definitely placing the story as after the 1980s, and the details of the road were quite primitive. After several trips and following explicit instructions from locals in the days before bossy smart phone apps, I found the road described was not the Lewiston Grade at all but an old switchback road which is every bit as bad as the book says and worse. I still had some issues with the story although parts of it I liked a lot and in the end couldn't decide whether I trusted the author enough to read any companion books, but here they are.

The Walk Series, by Sharon Creech

1. Absolutely Normal Chaos (1990)
2. Walk Two Moons (1994)
3. Chasing Redbird (1997)

(Walk Two Moons I have in hardcover and was vaguely aware of the existence of the others but of course don't have them.)

Lucky's Hard Pan Trilogy, by Susan Patron

1. The Higher Power of Lucky (2006)
2. Lucky Breaks (2009)
3. Lucky for Good (2011)

(The first two I have in hardcover and the third I had not heard of till I looked it up just now.)

The following should also be mentioned:

Time Quintet Series by Madeleine L'Engle

1. A Wrinkle in Time (1962)
2. A Wind in the Door (1973)
3. A Swiftly Tilting Planet (1978)
4. Many Waters (1986)
5. An Acceptable Time (1989)

(A Wrinkle in Time I have in hardcover, A Wind in the Door and A Swiftly Tilting Planet in paperback, Many Waters I don't think I have at all, and An Acceptable Time I had never even heard of till just now.)

Although My Side of the Mountain was only an honor book, the author did win gold for a book in another series.

Mountain Series by Jean Craighead George:

1. My Side of the Mountain (1959)
2. On the Far Side of the Mountain (1990)
3. Frightful's Mountain (1999)

(As far as I know I don't have hardbacks of any of them. Two different paperback editions of the first one and either paperbacks or permabound copies of the other two.)

Frightful's Daughter Series by Jean Craighead George:

1. Frightful's Daughter (1972)
2. Frightful's Daughter Meets the Baron Weasel (2007)

(These I don't have in any form. I only learned of them while trying to find a My Side of the Mountain audiobook.)
 

CoriSCapnSkip

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Another series by a Newbery Award winning author I am collecting:

The Witch Saga by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

1. Witch's Sister (1975)
2. Witch Water (1977)
3. The Witch Herself (1978)
4. The Witch's Eye (1990)
5. Witch Weed (1990)
6. The Witch Returns (1992)

(Witch's Sister and Witch Weed I have in paperback only, Witch Water, The Witch Herself, and The Witch's Eye in hardcover, and The Witch Returns I didn't know about until I went to look up the series on PaperbackSwap. Currently no hardcovers of the ones I need are available there.)
 

CoriSCapnSkip

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Another witch series I am collecting is Dorrie the Little Witch by Patricia Coombs. Here is a complete list. Those titles which are not bolded I have in hardcover and those which are bolded I need copies. Prefer hardcover but will accept any copies in reasonably good shape.

1. Dorrie's Magic
2. Dorrie and the Blue Witch
3. Dorrie's Play
4. Dorrie and the Weather-Box
5. Dorrie and the Witch Doctor
6. Dorrie and the Wizard's Spell
7. Dorrie and the Haunted House
8. Dorrie and the Birthday Eggs
9. Dorrie and the Goblin
10. Dorrie and the Fortune Teller
11. Dorrie and the Amazing Magic Elixir
12. Dorrie and the Witch's Imp
13. Dorrie and the Halloween Plot
14. Dorrie and the Dreamyard Monsters
15. Dorrie and the Screebit Ghost
16. Dorrie and the Witchville Fair
17. Dorrie and the Witch's Camp
18. Dorrie and the Museum Case
19. Dorrie and the Pin Witch
20. Dorrie and the Haunted Schoolhouse
 

CoriSCapnSkip

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Speaking of companion books to Newbery winners, Sour Land by William H. Armstrong, published in 1971, is a companion book, though not necessarily a sequel, to Sounder, published in 1969, which won the Newbery the following year--in other words, Sour Land was published before the film of Sounder, which came out in 1972! According to Sour Land, the unnamed main character in Sounder was named Moses Waters. In the movie, his name was David Lee Morgan. Sounder is one of the rare instances of a film being much better than the original book! Years later, Kevin Hooks, who played David Lee Morgan, made a Disney film of Sounder which more closely followed the book and was said to be absolutely awful. As far as how Sour Land compares to Sounder, some readers liked it better while others were bitterly disappointed.