Talisman-the worst novel by Stephen King? Direct question to the author

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Spideyman

Uber Member
Jul 10, 2006
42,904
168,161
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Just north of Duma Key
#41
Well, just to finalise... literature is also a science and any story can be deconstructed using lingvo stylistic tools. But I am not sure such a discussion would be proper on this forum. But u can always take a course of linguistics in the University:) Or read one of SK's essays on that mtr-some of them are really good.
I have taken courses in linguistics while studying at a University. Perhaps there is light at the end of the tunnel...... you make the statement: literature is also a science and any story can be deconstructed using lingvo stylistic tools. That is a true fact.
However, most Constant Readers do not read a SK book, or for that fact any author's books, to deconstruct the written words/story. That is for a University course, not for "pleasure reading". Therein is the problem. Have you tried just reading for the pure pleasure of being taken away to another place or time? Forget what is reality, forget that not every event is accurate, forget items found in the real world are different in the book. Forget structure, forget how it is suppose to be written and just enjoy the journey. I think you might look at The Talisman in a different light.
Personally, I prefer to leave the "science" of writing back in the Literature Courses and just enjoy the gift that SK gives within his books.
 

not_nadine

Comfortably Roont
Nov 19, 2011
29,494
138,490
Behind you
#43
I have taken courses in linguistics while studying at a University. Perhaps there is light at the end of the tunnel...... you make the statement: literature is also a science and any story can be deconstructed using lingvo stylistic tools. That is a true fact.
However, most Constant Readers do not read a SK book, or for that fact any author's books, to deconstruct the written words/story. That is for a University course, not for "pleasure reading". Therein is the problem. Have you tried just reading for the pure pleasure of being taken away to another place or time? Forget what is reality, forget that not every event is accurate, forget items found in the real world are different in the book. Forget structure, forget how it is suppose to be written and just enjoy the journey. I think you might look at The Talisman in a different light.
Personally, I prefer to leave the "science" of writing back in the Literature Courses and just enjoy the gift that SK gives within his books.

:grinning:
 

DiO'Bolic

Not completely obtuse
Nov 14, 2013
20,058
109,303
Poconos, PA
#44
Never got through it. But you definitely know that Leo Tolstoy was writing for money and he was dependant upon the amount of words. Same goes for Dikkens by the way-the more he wrote the more he got paid. So...they both never stopped... For me, Tolstoy had a touch of God when he wrote The Death of Ivan Illych. The rest was just... errr...
I read The Death of Ivan Illych back in my college days and sort of remember if fondly, but that was back in the hippie era and I seem to have lost a decade or two from memory. :)
 
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AnnaMarie

Well-Known Member
Feb 16, 2012
7,058
29,496
Other
#52
Ok, let's put it this way-this book contradicts almost every rule of his "On Writing". It's a dead-born child and it could have done well with some other wrriter but we al know how SK can (or could) write. It's really hard to make another masterpiece like Pet Sematary or MIsery and yet...
You searched for this page, registered, all just to come and tell a man he did a bad job. You refer to his book as a dead-born child? And that's not insulting?

You have insulted Mr. King and everyone who likes a book that you don't happen to like.

A writer may write for many reasons....but the only reason to publish is for money. I do not begrudge him or any other author for publishing for money.
 

mal

content
Jun 23, 2007
3,999
22,251
56
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
#56
Howdy Denis and welcome, I loved the Talisman and I loved Black House even more. I don't think the 'On Writing' book was meant to be carved in stone. Time passes and things change. What once worked then may not work now (or vice versa). I would think most of his teachings/suggestions in On Writing were aimed at himself doing his own writing. I would also think collaborations are a different kettle of tilapia. All the best, mal.
 

AnnaMarie

Well-Known Member
Feb 16, 2012
7,058
29,496
Other
#58
Howdy Denis and welcome, I loved the Talisman and I loved Black House even more. I don't think the 'On Writing' book was meant to be carved in stone. Time passes and things change. What once worked then may not work now (or vice versa). I would think most of his teachings/suggestions in On Writing were aimed at himself doing his own writing. I would also think collaborations are a different kettle of tilapia. All the best, mal.
Bold added by me. It's what I'm referring to.

It's been a very long time since I read 'On Writing'. I think it was new when I read it. But, doesn't he actually say something along those lines in the book?
 
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