Tell Us About Your "first Time"

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aintshesweet

Well-Known Member
Mar 24, 2011
201
191
38
New Orleans, LA
...I always read the Goosebumps, and Scary Stories, so was already into scary stuff. We were driving down to visit my uncle in Tennessee, and stopped at Hills to grab me a book. I saw Cujo, the one with the pinkish color, and just the pawprint on the front, and the black and white pic of SK on the back. I liked dogs. Figured it would be good. Which it was. I really liked it...
I have a similar story! I read the Goosebumps and Fear Street books. My best friend's grandfather would take us to the library every weekend and when I turned 12/13, I was wanting to up my horror reading game and I had heard of Stephen King (who hasn't?). I picked Cujo because my mom loves dogs and so do I. After that, I kept with the animal theme and read Pet Semetary. I was sold from that point on. I was just telling my mom that she was one of the reasons that I discovered SK because of her love of animals. She was confused, but accepted the compliment. :p
 

notebookgirl

Well-Known Member
Oct 8, 2013
853
4,886
Somewhere over the Rainbow
I was obsessed with Edgar Allan Poe when I was in elementary school. During that time, we could illustrate and write our own stories and then the school would laminate it and you could enter your book into a yearly contest. I did my own version of the "Pit and the Pendulum" where a girl was being chased around a house by a nasty-looking couple. She couldn't escape and was eventually caught, tied down and ripped open by a swinging pendulum. This gruesome story was illustrated by me and while I got an honorable mention ribbon, I didn't win the bigger awards. I don't think my teachers understood, ha! My first and favorite grown up book was "Life and Death of Andy Warhol" by Victor Bockris. That's how I learned about the band Velvet Underground.
Warhol.jpg
 

Takoren

Well-Known Member
Nov 25, 2015
242
815
41
Some good stories, here!

Mine's a bit long, so bear with me.

I was probably about 9 or 10 when I went with my parents to visit a new church member. My father's a pastor, so this kind of thing happened a lot. She was reading It and had the trade paperback on her coffee table with a bookmark in place. Dad questioned her about it and she made light of it, but I was intrigued. I had a friend, another pastor's son, who was three years older than me. I discovered shortly after noticing the book at the new church member's house that both he and his older brother (who seemed nearly an adult to little me) had read King before, and they both played him up as a writer who, if I were to so much as glance at a page of one of his books, wouldn't sleep for a week. I never forgot his name, and every time I saw a book of his in the library, I got more intrigued.

When I was in eighth grade, I borrowed Pet Sematary from a different friend. I had seen the Publishers Weekly quote that was plastered on the back of it - "The most frightening book Stephen King has ever written" - when my friend had shown me his copy and I decided this was the place to start. I read probably a third of it. Maybe less. Church had just come back to life. The reason I gave it back unfinished was because I knew that if my parents, particularly my mother, found me with it, I would be severely punished, so I could only read it when I was sure they weren't around to catch me. Finally I gave it back to my friend only partially read, knowing that trying to finish it would likely mean keeping it well into high school.

I read The Green Mile years later and just adored it. That's the book that turned me into a constant reader.
 

H-Epidemic

New Member
Dec 2, 2015
1
2
27
The very first time I read anything by Stephen King was early in high school. I had missed class the day of a test in AP Biology, so I had to sit out in the hallway while the test was discussed. It was boring and I had left all of my things in the classroom. Also, this was before my cellphone had the capability of having internet, etc. There happened to be an extremely old (at least, old looking) book next to the door that looked like it was falling apart. It was "Cujo" - property of my high school's library, stamped and everything. I didn't know who Stephen King was at the time (my parents do not read or watch horror of any kind), but I started reading the book out of boredom. I was hooked instantly and took the book with me (I still have it to this day). After reading it, I didn't really put two and two together and didn't seek out any other Stephen King books. But while I was getting my Bachelors degree, I decided to start again and read "The Stand", which is now one of my favorite books. I have been hooked ever since and I spend way too much money (and time) on books, his included! In fact, I'm supposed to be studying for finals for my Masters program at the moment, but I'm here typing this out...
 
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scarlet525

Member
Dec 20, 2015
8
24
61
Carrie was "the" movie to go see when I was in college. I liked the movie, so I got the book from the library. I didn't think it was fabulous, but it was OK. OK enough for me to pick up 'Salem's Lot in paperback later on.

Good thing I was on summer break, because that one I couldn't put down & read it straight thru in one sitting (I read fast). Unfortunately that meant I was going to bed after I finished the book at 2am. Wasn't common to have a/c in those days, so my bedroom windows were open. Every infinitesimal sound seemed magnified. I kept thinking about Danny Glick scratching at Mark's screen & squinting at mine in the dark. I finally had to give up & turn the light on. Just so I could keep an eye on those screens.... :O_O:

That's when I decided this Stephen King guy had books I should look out for, & now I need bigger bookcases.
 

TheDMan

Active Member
Feb 16, 2008
39
2
I was 12 when The Shining movie came out. My best friend went to see it. He told me about it and it sounded like an awesome movie, but I wasn't able to see it at the time due to my age. I was about 16 when I was finally able to read the book. No other book before had creeped me out the way The Shining did. I've read quite a few SK books since and The Shining is my second favorite right behind It. I saw the movie shortly after reading the book and while it is quite different I did like the movie.
 
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Arcadevere

Gentle Lady From Brady Hartsfield Defense Squad
Mar 3, 2016
793
3,685
Manila, Philippines
steamcommunity.com
I was 11 years old when i first discover Stephen King because of my Fave Local author's book, Bob Ong's Stainless Longganisa (Longganisa is a food in philippines, try to look at it lol), that book was all about his writing life, he keep mentioning Stephen King's On Writing and tells how much he influence by that book in his writing life (Bob Ong was only his pseudonym his real name was still unknown as of now, and he was my facebook friend actually lol), and suggest that we should read it if you are pursuing to be a Writer.

that day, i went to bookstore to find King's On Writing, instead of On Writing, i picked up Cujo Because on writing was Out of stock and Cujo was the cheapest book at the Sk's Book rack and that rolls the ball of me as King's reader
 

Owenk

Well-Known Member
Nov 13, 2014
351
2,059
58
I was probably about 52 years old.

I had kind of conciously never read Mr. King because I had decided I don't like horror as a genre and had foolishly not realised:

1) he doesn't just do horror; and
2) even when he does his books are ultimately about people and so fascinating anyway.

So I was stuck for something to read and chanced across The Gunslinger. To cut a long story short he had me at:

“The man in Black fled across the Desert, and the Gunslinger followed.”
 

Blake

Deleted User
Feb 18, 2013
4,191
17,477
This is the first time. Five schooners just drank at the General Robert's Hotel in New Lambton and too packed so went to the library, and go back in 30. Maybe go to the Duke of Wellington. Read Mr. King first time in 1978. He is Clint Eastwood with a pen. I think Owen likes James Joyce or the Welshman, Thomas. I like the Welsh because they have that sing-song accent like Swedish. I have picture of myself with people. I feel funny now. The Librarian in here has long brown hair. I will drink another five beers.
 
Apr 14, 2016
17
77
25
I was 13 when I was out with my mom for groceries at the Tesco's. While she was getting stuff, I was looking at the covers of books. I really liked the one of Cell's. So I told my mom to get it for me even though I never read anything before besides comics. I started to read it on our way back home, the story and the characters sucked me in and I read it in a few days. I even had a crush on Alice haha. Thats when I became a constant King reader. One ofhe best things that happened in my life
 

GNTLGNT

The idiot is IN
Jun 15, 2007
86,051
347,101
58
Cambridge, Ohio
This is the first time. Five schooners just drank at the General Robert's Hotel in New Lambton and too packed so went to the library, and go back in 30. Maybe go to the Duke of Wellington. Read Mr. King first time in 1978. He is Clint Eastwood with a pen. I think Owen likes James Joyce or the Welshman, Thomas. I like the Welsh because they have that sing-song accent like Swedish. I have picture of myself with people. I feel funny now. The Librarian in here has long brown hair. I will drink another five beers.
...cool story *hiccup!* bro!...
 
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Steven Duval

New Member
Apr 22, 2016
4
18
54
How's that for a title? :biggrin-new:

Actually, I'm curious. How many of you remember your first experience with Sai King? What was the book/story, how old were you, why did you get it/who did you get it from, etc.

I'll start it off. I was 12 years old and home with a fever and a bad case of chicken pox. Earlier in the week, I had bought my mom a paperback copy of Pet Sematary, as she often took me to see horror movies and we both loved to read. I was home and bored, so I found my way into her room and took the book off her bookshelf. For the record, she had no idea I was reading it, and I probably shouldn't have. I was done for. I had the book read by the end of the day, and as soon as I was healthy, I went out a picked up a copy of 'Salem's Lot, and I was firmly established as a Constant Reader ever since.
15? 198? Nightshift picked it up in one of those thrift stores where you brought in your comics and they gave you half credit for any of the other used books/comics to take home. I liked it because it looked cool with the deadeyes of the hand from the "I am the Doorway story"
looking out from holes in the cover. I went from Archie and Jughead to this. and to The Joy of Sex by Masters and Johnson which was equally frightening for a boy of 15 by the way. The stories in Nightshift weren't all barn burners but enough had that "reveal" at the end that gave me a sense of awe in the true sense of the word.
It was wtf 80's style and I was all in.
I've been a little perplexed over the years to figure out how I was hooked in on the first page of all of his novels good or bad. To have to delve into the story to see what happens next. Turns out it's a part of his writing process to do that.
Well played Mr. King well played.
 

Dana Jean

Moderator
Moderator
Apr 11, 2006
51,040
222,334
Thornfield
15? 198? Nightshift picked it up in one of those thrift stores where you brought in your comics and they gave you half credit for any of the other used books/comics to take home. I liked it because it looked cool with the deadeyes of the hand from the "I am the Doorway story"
looking out from holes in the cover. I went from Archie and Jughead to this. and to The Joy of Sex by Masters and Johnson which was equally frightening for a boy of 15 by the way. The stories in Nightshift weren't all barn burners but enough had that "reveal" at the end that gave me a sense of awe in the true sense of the word.
It was wtf 80's style and I was all in.
I've been a little perplexed over the years to figure out how I was hooked in on the first page of all of his novels good or bad. To have to delve into the story to see what happens next. Turns out it's a part of his writing process to do that.
Well played Mr. King well played.
welcome Steven!
 

daniel ray brower

Well-Known Member
Apr 28, 2016
58
203
48
Atlanta, Ga.
I was 19 my first time. Picked up IT in a drug store. Back when you could still get a paperback for about $6. So anyway, I was living with my grandmother and had nothing to do but watch tv. I got tired of that eventually... So I took It home and it took me about a week to read the whole thing. And like I said in another post... I was reaching into rooms to turn on the lights for about a week afterwards...lol. It scared me but good. since then I've been hooked...
 

duf70

Well-Known Member
May 27, 2008
119
114
Monterrey, Mexico
My first time was back when I was 17 years old, I had been reading some mistery novels back then, and happened to spot a copy of Misery at my local bookstore. I decided to give it a try and read the whole book in three days, totally loved it, got hooked right away. I did some of my reading during class in college, obviously sitting in the last row!

From there I jumped to Salem's Lot, The Stand, Tommyknockers...and so on and on...

I really love King's work and will remain his constant reader all my life.
 
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Kingunlucky

Well-Known Member
Aug 20, 2016
368
1,680
Ummmm hmm

I had to be around 13-14 and needed something to fill the void of The Dresden Files which is a series I'd finished. I mean I didn't finish it but I'd read all the books (more have come out since thankfully). But I'd been meaning to read King for awhile and someone suggested the Dark Tower books.

So I went ahead and read The Gunslinger.

The rest is history.
 

recitador

Speed Reader
Sep 3, 2016
1,746
8,215
36
5th grade, circa 1992 or 3, It. That may or may not have been when i first started bringing novels to school to read (i forget), but it definitely wasn't the beginning of my love of books, as there was the hardy boys before that, among others. i know by the time i hit junior high i was never without a novel, and at the rate i chew through books, it was a different novel every day by high school. i'm assuming i did bring it to school, because i vaguely remember having a discussion with my 5th grade teacher about reading It and how impressed she was that i was reading something so mature. although, ironically, i found It a lot less disturbing as a child than i do as an adult. maybe because the concept of death hadn't really set in yet. luckily, my love of reading set in early, partly inspired by my mother, who used to read a lot of horror novels. weirdly enough, when my mother got older she wouldn't read anything but romance novels. go figure
 
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