The "remedies"

  • New to the board or trying to figure out how something works here? Check out the User Guide.
  • The message board is closed between the hours of 4pm ET Friday and 8:30am ET Monday.

    As always, the Board will be open to read and those who have those privileges can still send private messages and post to Profiles.

Paranoid Paintbrush

Well-Known Member
Nov 11, 2014
77
382
36
UK - south-west
#1
I've had trouble sleeping since childhood, so it was really a foregone conclusion that I would love this book [I did, from the first reading :)]. I especially identified with the parts detailing the various "cures" Ralph tried, as it is so, so true of my own experiences - so many suggestions, and none of them have helped! I just laughed so much reading those bits; for me, SK captured the scenario perfectly, in a way that really got me invested in the story. I'd be interested to know some other opinions, and of course who's a fellow insomniac ;)

My personal favourite "sleep aid" = Valerian. It made me hyper. I went on a manic cleaning mission for no reason. :Oo:
 

Paranoid Paintbrush

Well-Known Member
Nov 11, 2014
77
382
36
UK - south-west
#3
I agree, and I hope that you find something that helps when you need it. I understand the fear of nightmares too; if they wake you up, they're a form of insomnia themselves! "Stressful tiring" sums it up perfectly. You "should" be asleep...I should stop saying that to myself. And I am so glad to hear that it's not only me who doesn't like mirrors!

SK got all this right for me in the book. If he hasn't experienced insomnia/sleep disturbance personally, his research was spot-on. :)

Thanks for the reply, and best wishes to you.
 

Neesy

#1 fan (Annie Wilkes cousin) 1st cousin Mom's side
May 24, 2012
57,447
212,858
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
#4
I agree, and I hope that you find something that helps when you need it. I understand the fear of nightmares too; if they wake you up, they're a form of insomnia themselves! "Stressful tiring" sums it up perfectly. You "should" be asleep...I should stop saying that to myself. And I am so glad to hear that it's not only me who doesn't like mirrors!

SK got all this right for me in the book. If he hasn't experienced insomnia/sleep disturbance personally, his research was spot-on. :)

Thanks for the reply, and best wishes to you.
As I get older I seem to need less sleep to function. When I was in my 20s and 30s I had to get a full eight hours to feel refreshed.
Hot milk (heated in the microwave until it is very hot then cooled off a bit) has helped me in the past.

When I was under much stress at one time the only thing that helped was Ativan or lorazepam (same thing) but this is not something you can take for extended periods without it eventually not working.
 

not_nadine

Comfortably Roont
Nov 19, 2011
29,489
138,423
Behind you
#9
Sounds funny, but saying the Rosary can nearly always put me to sleep. No disrespect intended; maybe it's the repetition? Or that I make myself really think about what I'm saying (thinking), so other worries can't creep in? Either way, it usually works for me.
Sorry, but I first read that as "The Rosemary" I thought I missed a remedy.
 

Paranoid Paintbrush

Well-Known Member
Nov 11, 2014
77
382
36
UK - south-west
#13
As I get older I seem to need less sleep to function. When I was in my 20s and 30s I had to get a full eight hours to feel refreshed.
Hot milk (heated in the microwave until it is very hot then cooled off a bit) has helped me in the past.

When I was under much stress at one time the only thing that helped was Ativan or lorazepam (same thing) but this is not something you can take for extended periods without it eventually not working.
Yes, that is an issue with them unfortunately :/ Hot milk is a good one, I agree; I like to put honey in mine - liquid comfort! Bit of nutmeg sprinkled over...yum! But medicinal of course :friendly_wink:

Sounds funny, but saying the Rosary can nearly always put me to sleep. No disrespect intended; maybe it's the repetition? Or that I make myself really think about what I'm saying (thinking), so other worries can't creep in? Either way, it usually works for me.
I agree, big time, about calming repetitive actions - my latest discovery is loom bands, which has turned out to be a really therapeutic craft! Both mentally and physically for me; I have issues with my wrists so the movement is great, and mentally, it's just really satisfying - easy to learn, but the results look good, and they make good gifts :) [I have to wonder how many parents of younger kids can now loom band, regardless of whether they intended to learn ;)]

Regarding rosemary, I think as an essential oil it's refreshing/stimulating; a "daytime" oil by itself, if you like, but good in insomnia-busting blends as it clears your head, and thus helps you to think more calmly/clearly. The same goes for the citrus oils - they can be uplifting but relaxing at the same time. And of course, they all smell great :smile-new:
 
Likes: skimom2
We’ve created a Stephen King Library action for the 
			  Google Assistant and skill for Amazon Alexa. It'll give 
			  you a personalized reading recommendations based on your 
			  answers to a series of questions—so what are you waiting 
			  for? Find out which Stephen King book you should read 
			  next! Castle Rock - Wednesdays on Hulu The second season of Mr. Mercedes premieres at 10pm on August 22nd, only on Audience.