Can We Show Off Our Crafts?

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Spideyman

Uber Member
Jul 10, 2006
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Just north of Duma Key
Okay all you quilters, I need some help. When I was growing up, my favorite blanket was an old homemade quilt that my grandma had given me. It was so soft and comfortable. I always had it on my bed, and when I was sick, wrapping up in that quilt made me feel better. It finally fell apart in the wash when I was 17. I want to make a similar quilt for my bed now. It was a simple patchwork, with large squares of mismatched fabric. I think it was filled with some sort of batting, and the only top stitching I remember is that it was tied in the middle of each square with a thick thread or thin yarn. Does anyone know what I'm talking about, and how to go about making it?
MsMod will be the expert, but I recall something like what you are mentioning- known as a hand tie quilt. One could use battling for the fill or and old/ new blanket.
The top piece is basic squares either hand sewn or machine together/ the backing was a plain sheet of material or bed sheet. One the layers where sewn together you simply used yarn and needle and at each meeting corner made a tie/ bow. Some preferred doing it in the middle of the square.
32535
 

Moderator

Ms. Mod
Administrator
Jul 10, 2006
50,949
147,999
Maine
Okay all you quilters, I need some help. When I was growing up, my favorite blanket was an old homemade quilt that my grandma had given me. It was so soft and comfortable. I always had it on my bed, and when I was sick, wrapping up in that quilt made me feel better. It finally fell apart in the wash when I was 17. I want to make a similar quilt for my bed now. It was a simple patchwork, with large squares of mismatched fabric. I think it was filled with some sort of batting, and the only top stitching I remember is that it was tied in the middle of each square with a thick thread or thin yarn. Does anyone know what I'm talking about, and how to go about making it?
It's called a scrap or scrappy quilt when there are mismatched fabrics. Spidey described the process well for hand tying it and Dana Jean could help you out with that as she's finished quilts that way. You can find everything you'd need regarding fabric (cotton is most often used) and batting (don't use 100% polyester) at either a quilt shop (you'll pay more but the fabric quality is better) or a store like JoAnn's. The Warm & Natural batting they sell is a good weight and washes nicely. YouTube will have more tutorials than you'd ever need and is a great resource for quilting how-tos and any tutorials by Missouri Star Quilt Company are terrific. They can take what seems like a complicated process and turn it into simple, easy to follow steps from cutting to the final binding. If you need any specific advice, don't hesitate to reach out to me either here or in a PM.
 

Moderator

Ms. Mod
Administrator
Jul 10, 2006
50,949
147,999
Maine
Just thought of something else. If you want something like in the picture Spidey put in her post, you might consider buying charm packs. They are pre-cut to 5" squares and will have different patterns within the packs--usually about 40-42 squares to the pack. They're a more affordable option than buying fabric if you don't have a stash on hand. You'll need to buy more than one pack to do a quilt, but how many depends on how big you want your quilt to be.
 

Dana Jean

Moderator
Moderator
Apr 11, 2006
51,914
227,860
Thornfield
MsMod will be the expert, but I recall something like what you are mentioning- known as a hand tie quilt. One could use battling for the fill or and old/ new blanket.
The top piece is basic squares either hand sewn or machine together/ the backing was a plain sheet of material or bed sheet. One the layers where sewn together you simply used yarn and needle and at each meeting corner made a tie/ bow. Some preferred doing it in the middle of the square.
View attachment 32535
These were very popular quilts, usually of suit fabrics, feed sacks, pillow ticking, old cotton dresses and polyesters, tied with yarn, string or embroidery thread and yes, like spidey said, the inside was usually old sheets or blankets. Our foremothers (and maybe some quilting forefathers) used what they had. Nothing went to waste. If you want it to be authentic like that, those would be your ingredients. They wear well and last a long time, but like Marsha said, I would definitely use modern materials to make the job easier. Tying through old sheets is very hard. I've made a traditional quilt like this and it is tedious work. And I own 3 from my grandmother's sister's who sat around and helped each other make these blankets for gifts they would hand out.

In the old days, these would be designated blankets as they were tied. And quilts were only quilts if it was all hand done with the fancy stitching on the top, hand done. No machine involvement at all. As if!!! Of course, this snobbery is out the window and they are all quilts today.

Go pretty cottons, and if you can, I'd use the charm packs like Marsha said. They are pre cut and quality fabrics. Here is a chart:


Use a quality thread to make it last. Cheap thread will fray and wear quickly and the time you spent putting this together will be wasted. You want this to last.

You can go cheap with batting, but I would also try to buy quality. The finished product is only as long lasting as the products you use. Cheaper can still be cute, but it won't last long and won't wash as well. Or, maybe it will last just long enough. It depends on your wallet and what you hope to accomplish. No matter what though, a quilt is a wonderful thing!

Also, as a rule of thumb, tying should be a hand width's distance from each. Use a square knot or surgeon's knot.

As Marsha said, Missouri Star is a great source of easy information. Fons and Porter also have some good youtubes. As do various other quilters. there is always a quilting answer in a youtube!
 
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Dana Jean

Moderator
Moderator
Apr 11, 2006
51,914
227,860
Thornfield
Spideyman, Moderator, Dana Jean
Thanks, Y'all! I knew someone would know what I was talking about. I am going to attempt this as soon as the summer clients head out of town. It might take me until summer to do it, but I've missed that blanket my grandma gave me, and I want one.
It's a lot of work, Be careful with your arms, shoulders and back as sitting sewing in one position can really seize a person up.
 
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