Doesn't hold up to repeated viewing

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GeorgieFan2003

Bill and Georgie Fan
Sep 17, 2017
1,376
4,480
36
Wouldn't be much of a discussion board without opposing viewpoints, would it?
Having discussions of opposing viewpoints is good in my opinion. What I was referring to was nitpicking. I get that not everyone is gonna like something. I know that Sophia Lillis gets alot of attention for her role as Bev. I think she did a great job, but in my opinion I thought Jackson showed a bit more playing the 2 Georgies.
 

Dana Jean

Dirty Pirate Hooker, The Return
Moderator
Apr 11, 2006
53,633
236,696
The High Seas
I'm not clear on whether or not you're implying that I, or anyone else, have presented inappropriately.
sigh. No. I'm not implying anything about anyone if it doesn't apply to you or them. I am just making a general comment that differing opinions is great, as long as they are done respectfully by the parties involved.
 

M_O_O_N

Member
Dec 27, 2017
11
62
48
IMVHO, that goes without saying unless it needs to be said. Egro, concern that someone (possibly me) overstepped a boundary. Being new here it seems the sensitivity level may be set to maximum because everyone is super, super nice. A horror fan might even imagine the kind of nice that borders on fear. So, glad we've cleared that up. Thanks. Sorry you had to sigh.
 

Robert Gray

Well-Known Member
It holds up for me and I'm not exactly easy on films. :) I received my copy from Amazon yesterday and already watched it again and the special features. I'm looking forward to seeing the Director's Cut, although I'm sure it will simply add the special features into the continuity and extend the film by 15 minutes or so. I don't relish having to buy it again, but what can you do? Does the film compare to the book? Of course it doesn't. It would take a mini-series done as well as American Gods on Starz to truly capture the book on screen. You can't (or at least you shouldn't) judge it by that criteria. You have to take it entirely on its own merits.

For me, the film was just as engaging on the second viewing. If anything, I enjoyed it more. Of course I reside at what I believe was the inspiration for the little Church that Mike Hanlon almost runs to in the book, but changes his mind because he realizes that the caretaker will be asleep by the boiler and he will get his head caved in by Bowers long before the door is answered. My place overlooks the point of the green dagger aimed at the heart of downtown, Bangor/Derry's Barrens. It is kind of surreal to watch the film (or read the book) in the place that inspired it. Moreover, I take great glee in the fact that my Street also is mentioned in the book and isn't even fictionalized. It is brief mention, but there just the same.

My view of the kids cast as the Losers is that some are clearly much stronger than others, and the Director correctly homed in on the best of them and they got more personal attention and screen time. None of them are terrible, but when you cast seven young actors it would be impossible to have them all be future Oscar winners. I disagree with the original posters comments on Bill. I thought he did just fine. Would I have been happier with someone who looked more like the Bill in my mind? Sure. But again, you have to take things as self contained and in that light the guy is great. I continue to wish that they had planned on a trilogy, and that the first two would have been them as kids and the last as adults. The first film going up until the rock fight and the firs time seeing it in the slide show (that would have been a hell of a way to end it). The second film being the escalating war with Bowers and It. Such a break into two pictures would have allowed more time for each Loser and invested us more in each of them.

Most of the complaints I've heard from various people who loved the book is that the Loser they liked the best or identified with the most didn't get good play in the film. That is an understandable gripe, but that time will come. I have faith given the reception of this film that a Cable Series is at most two years away. As long as the second film doesn't tank, that is a mortal lock.
 

GeorgieFan2003

Bill and Georgie Fan
Sep 17, 2017
1,376
4,480
36
It holds up for me and I'm not exactly easy on films. :) I received my copy from Amazon yesterday and already watched it again and the special features. I'm looking forward to seeing the Director's Cut, although I'm sure it will simply add the special features into the continuity and extend the film by 15 minutes or so. I don't relish having to buy it again, but what can you do? Does the film compare to the book? Of course it doesn't. It would take a mini-series done as well as American Gods on Starz to truly capture the book on screen. You can't (or at least you shouldn't) judge it by that criteria. You have to take it entirely on its own merits.

For me, the film was just as engaging on the second viewing. If anything, I enjoyed it more. Of course I reside at what I believe was the inspiration for the little Church that Mike Hanlon almost runs to in the book, but changes his mind because he realizes that the caretaker will be asleep by the boiler and he will get his head caved in by Bowers long before the door is answered. My place overlooks the point of the green dagger aimed at the heart of downtown, Bangor/Derry's Barrens. It is kind of surreal to watch the film (or read the book) in the place that inspired it. Moreover, I take great glee in the fact that my Street also is mentioned in the book and isn't even fictionalized. It is brief mention, but there just the same.

My view of the kids cast as the Losers is that some are clearly much stronger than others, and the Director correctly homed in on the best of them and they got more personal attention and screen time. None of them are terrible, but when you cast seven young actors it would be impossible to have them all be future Oscar winners. I disagree with the original posters comments on Bill. I thought he did just fine. Would I have been happier with someone who looked more like the Bill in my mind? Sure. But again, you have to take things as self contained and in that light the guy is great. I continue to wish that they had planned on a trilogy, and that the first two would have been them as kids and the last as adults. The first film going up until the rock fight and the firs time seeing it in the slide show (that would have been a hell of a way to end it). The second film being the escalating war with Bowers and It. Such a break into two pictures would have allowed more time for each Loser and invested us more in each of them.

Most of the complaints I've heard from various people who loved the book is that the Loser they liked the best or identified with the most didn't get good play in the film. That is an understandable gripe, but that time will come. I have faith given the reception of this film that a Cable Series is at most two years away. As long as the second film doesn't tank, that is a mortal lock.
I thought they did a good job on the movie myself. If they were do it in multiple parts, they should film them at the same time. One thing about kids, they grow. If they take the time like they are doing now. They grow between the time of filming. That can throw the continuity out the window. Boy do I have my experience with online nitpickers who would notice it right away(not here though ;))
 

mjs9153

Peripherally known member..
Nov 21, 2014
3,494
22,165
It holds up for me and I'm not exactly easy on films. :) I received my copy from Amazon yesterday and already watched it again and the special features. I'm looking forward to seeing the Director's Cut, although I'm sure it will simply add the special features into the continuity and extend the film by 15 minutes or so. I don't relish having to buy it again, but what can you do? Does the film compare to the book? Of course it doesn't. It would take a mini-series done as well as American Gods on Starz to truly capture the book on screen. You can't (or at least you shouldn't) judge it by that criteria. You have to take it entirely on its own merits.

For me, the film was just as engaging on the second viewing. If anything, I enjoyed it more. Of course I reside at what I believe was the inspiration for the little Church that Mike Hanlon almost runs to in the book, but changes his mind because he realizes that the caretaker will be asleep by the boiler and he will get his head caved in by Bowers long before the door is answered. My place overlooks the point of the green dagger aimed at the heart of downtown, Bangor/Derry's Barrens. It is kind of surreal to watch the film (or read the book) in the place that inspired it. Moreover, I take great glee in the fact that my Street also is mentioned in the book and isn't even fictionalized. It is brief mention, but there just the same.

My view of the kids cast as the Losers is that some are clearly much stronger than others, and the Director correctly homed in on the best of them and they got more personal attention and screen time. None of them are terrible, but when you cast seven young actors it would be impossible to have them all be future Oscar winners. I disagree with the original posters comments on Bill. I thought he did just fine. Would I have been happier with someone who looked more like the Bill in my mind? Sure. But again, you have to take things as self contained and in that light the guy is great. I continue to wish that they had planned on a trilogy, and that the first two would have been them as kids and the last as adults. The first film going up until the rock fight and the firs time seeing it in the slide show (that would have been a hell of a way to end it). The second film being the escalating war with Bowers and It. Such a break into two pictures would have allowed more time for each Loser and invested us more in each of them.

Most of the complaints I've heard from various people who loved the book is that the Loser they liked the best or identified with the most didn't get good play in the film. That is an understandable gripe, but that time will come. I have faith given the reception of this film that a Cable Series is at most two years away. As long as the second film doesn't tank, that is a mortal lock.
For me,it was okay..some gripes,of course,but not going ballistic over them..I thought the kid who played Ben,and the girl who played Bev,were fine as paint,as SK would say.One thing that I thought would be cool would be this as a three part movie,and the interim,second movie,be the Derry Interludes from the book.Including the arrival of It in the pleosticene or whatever age.Would have loved to seen the black spot,the Bradley gang,the crazy lumberjack and the first settlement wipeout,in depth,to explore the true evil of It..but you can't always get what you want.Have to see what happens in part 2,but this was okay..
 

fushingfeef

Finally Uber!
Aug 14, 2009
10,194
21,965
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
I dug it, immediately wanted to see IT again, and take other people along to see IT. I was worried it would lose some luster the 2nd time around but I enjoyed IT just as much or maybe even a little more the 2nd time.

Now that I have IT on Blu Ray I want to see IT again but I'm trying not to overdo IT. I sometimes "ruin" albums by playing them too much when I like them, and I wouldn't want that to happen to this movie!
 

Gerald

Well-Known Member
Sep 8, 2011
2,201
7,168
The Netherlands
It's funny, I keep *thinking back* on the movie and it registers as "pretty good" even though while I watched it, I was noting all the areas that lack and are disappointing. I wonder which is more important, how you recall a film or how it makes you feel while you're watching it? Hmmm....
I hardly go to the cinema anymore. For me there is too much distracting from the film - often the sound is too loud at the cinema; the sound overwhelms the image too much. I also find it easier at home to fully take in the film - when I watch a film back at home that I saw at the cinema there's often some stuff that I had totally forgotten about.

I think it's both important: the experience while you're watching it, but also if it made enough of an impression to stick with you. When you watch a film from a book you like, the first time you spend too much time comparing the two and don't take the film on its own merits often. The same is true with remakes: you're concerned wether they got everything right and not left important things out, rather than see if the film is good on its own - remakes I have to see at least two times to fully make up my mind.
 

Gerald

Well-Known Member
Sep 8, 2011
2,201
7,168
The Netherlands
I like the quality of blu-ray more than what you see in the cinema.

Also sometimes the films are just too dark and 3D glasses make it even worse. I noticed this especially with Rogue One. In the cinema I could see what was going on, but just barely. When I saw the blu-ray it was much, much lighter and you could see so much more.
I sometimes wonder if they project them wrong when they're that dark or that it's supposed to be that way. I suppose it's meant to be so dark.
The Force Awakens was dark too, but Rogue One was much darker.
 

Blake

Deleted User
Feb 18, 2013
4,191
17,479
How come when all the boys are going to dive into the river off the ledge, they all are wearing white underpants? I am currently watching IT on DVD and watched the first 40 minutes last night. One thing I think might have been better is not to show Pennywise so early in the movie. I still like the young actors and the young punks in the movie. I'm up to where Beverly sees the blood coming out of the sink.